By Date


  • 6-December-2016

    English

    Back to Work: United States - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is part of a series of nine reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that the United States has a relatively high rate of job displacement and that only one in two affected workers find a new job within one year. Older displaced workers and those with a low level of education fare worst. Contrary to most other OECD countries, displaced workers have long been a target group for policy intervention, and a number of system features, like rapid response services, are promising. But the success of US policies is limited because overall funding for the workforce development system is insufficient and because only trade-related job displacement comes with generous entitlement for training and better benefits.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Sweden

    The costs of a persistent misalignment between the supply and demand for skills are substantial, ranging from lost wages for workers to lower productivity for firms and countries. Addressing skills imbalances has become even more of a concern as OECD governments reflect on the implications of technological progress, digitisation, demographic change and globalisation for jobs and work organisation. In light of these challenges, OECD has undertaken new research to shed light on how countries measure changing skill needs while ensuring that employment, training and migration institutions are responsive to the emergence of new skill requirements. The Getting Skills Right in Sweden review offers an in-depth analysis of the key areas where policy action is required to spur the development of an efficient system for skills assessment and anticipation to inform policy in the country. The report provides an assessment of practices in the following areas: i) the collection of information on existing and future skill needs; ii) the use of skill needs information to guide policy development in the areas of labour, education and migration; and iii) the existence of effective governance arrangements to ensure good co-ordination among the key stakeholders in the collection and use of skill needs information.

  • 24-November-2016

    English

    Back to Work: Finland - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less  and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is part of a series of nine reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that Finland has a higher rate of job displacement than most OECD countries but that most of these workers find a new job again relatively quickly. However, those who do not face a considerable risk of long-term unemployment; with older displaced workers and those with a low level of education facing the highest risk. While labour market institutions in Finland serve most displaced jobseekers well, there is room to improve policies for those at risk of long-term unemployment or inactivity who would benefit from earlier identification of their problems and early, effective and well-targeted counselling and intervention.

  • 21-November-2016

    English

    SME and Entrepreneurship Policy in Israel 2016

    This report examines Israel’s performance in stimulating SMEs and entrepreneurship and makes recommendations for government policy. A dual economy has gradually emerged in Israel, in which high rates of successful technology-based entrepreneurship contrast with low average productivity and growth in traditional SMEs. Israel has excellent framework conditions and programmes for technology-based start-ups and SMEs in areas such as R&D, high-level skills generation and venture capital finance. These strengths need to be maintained. At the same time, more needs to be done to spread success to all types of SMEs and all groups of the Israeli population. This report recommends a range of new and expanded interventions for example in access to credit, broad innovation, workforce skills development, management support and entrepreneurship education. It recommends underpinning these actions with a national SME and entrepreneurship policy strategy and new arrangements for inter-ministerial co-ordination.

  • 21-novembre-2016

    Français

    Création d'emplois et développement économique local 2016 (Version abrégée)

    Cette seconde édition de la publication phare du Programme LEED, Création d’emplois et développement économique local,  explore les moyens par lesquels les acteurs nationaux et locaux peuvent mieux travailler ensemble pour soutenir le développement économique et la création d’emplois au niveau local. Elle apporte un éclairage sur toute une série d’enjeux, allant de l’adaptation du développement des compétences aux besoins des territoires, à l’implication des employeurs dans les systèmes d’apprentissage et à la mise en œuvre efficace des politiques en faveur des PME et de l’entrepreneuriat. Cette publication présente des comparaisons internationales permettant aux territoires de mieux appréhender leur positionnement face aux défis liés à l’emploi et aux compétences. Dans cette version française abrégée, les profils de pays de la Belgique, du Canada, de la France, et de la Suisse sont présentés. Ces derniers comprennent, entre autre, des nouvelles données sur l'offre et la demande des compétences au niveau régional ou infrarégional.

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  • 14-novembre-2016

    Français

    Taux de chômage harmonisés de l'OCDE - Mise à jour : novembre 2016

    Le taux de chômage de la zone OCDE stable à 6.3% en septembre 2016

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  • 31-October-2016

    English, PDF, 369kb

    Indonesia Policy Brief: Enhancing Job Quality

    Sustained growth and job creation have helped increase Indonesian living standards significantly, but the quality of available jobs remains low, which is a major drag on well-being. In particular, a high incidence of informal jobs in Indonesia means that a large number of workers face the risk of persistent poverty.

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  • 29-October-2016

    English

    Latin American Economic Outlook 2017 - Youth, Skills and Entrepreneurship

    The 2017 edition of the Latin American Economic Outlook explores youth, skills and entrepreneurship. Young Latin Americans embody the region’s promise and perils. They stand at the crossroads of a region whose once promising economy and social progress are now undergoing a slowdown. The Outlook identifies potential strategies and policy responses to help Latin America and the Caribbean revive economic growth. While development can stem from different sources, skills and entrepreneurship can empower youth to develop knowledge-intensive economic activities, boost productivity and transform the region’s politics as they transition successfully from the world of school to the world of productive work and create that future they seek. The report highlights valuable experiences and best practices in these fields and proposes strategies to allow Latin America to consolidate long-term growth while assuring continuity in the social agenda.

  • 28-October-2016

    English

    Connecting People with Jobs: The Labour Market, Activation Policies and Disadvantaged Workers in Slovenia

    Giving people better opportunities to participate actively in the labour market improves well-being. It also helps countries to cope with rapid population ageing by mobilising more fully each country’s potential labour resources. However, weak labour market attachment of some groups in society reflects a range of barriers to working or moving up the jobs ladder. This report on Slovenia is the second country study published in a series of reports looking into how activation policies can encourage greater labour market participation of all groups in society with a special focus on the most disadvantaged. Labour market and activation policies are well developed in Slovenia. However, the global financial crisis hit Slovenia hard and revealed some structural weaknesses in the system, which have contributed to a high level of long-term unemployment and low employment rates for some groups. This report on Slovenia therefore focuses on activation policies to improve labour market outcomes for four groups: long-term unemployed people; low-skilled workers; older workers; and workers who were made or are at risk of becoming displaced. There is room to improve policies through promoting longer working lives and through enabling the Employment Service and related institutions to help more harder-to-place jobseekers back into employment.

  • 19-octobre-2016

    Français

    Situation de l'emploi dans la zone OCDE, deuxième trimestre 2016

    Le taux d’emploi de l’OCDE continue d'augmenter, à 66.9% au deuxième trimestre 2016

    Documents connexes
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