Latest Documents


  • 12-mai-2015

    Français

    L’OCDE dévoile les mesures que les gouvernements peuvent prendre pour éviter les importants surcoûts liés à une consommation nocive d’alcool

    La consommation à risque est en augmentation, chez les jeunes et chez les femmes, dans de nombreux pays de l’OCDE, en partie parce que les boissons alcoolisées sont devenues plus aisément disponibles et plus accessibles financièrement, et qu’elles font l’objet de campagnes de publicité efficaces, selon un nouveau rapport de l’OCDE.

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  • 7-May-2015

    English, PDF, 371kb

    Monitoring Progress in reducing the gender gap in labour force participation

    In November 2014, the G20 Leaders committed to reduce the gender labour force participation gap by 25% by 2025, as a collective commitment at G20 level. As an input to that decision, the G20 Labour and Employment Ministers issued a Declaration which included this issue and set forth 11 policy areas for potential action. This note proposes options and approaches for tracking the Leaders’ commitment to reduce the gender gap.

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  • 6-May-2015

    English, PDF, 405kb

    Focus on Minimum wages after the crisis: Making them pay (PDF, 12-pages)

    Three out of four OECD countries use minimum wages, and supporting low-wage earners is widely seen as important for promoting inclusive growth. This policy brief considers three aspects that are central for a balanced assessment of policy choices: The cost of employing minimum-wage workers, their take-home pay, and the number of workers affected.

  • 29-April-2015

    English

    Health systems are still not prepared for an ageing population

    OECD insights blog: Francesca Colombo, Head of the OECD Health Division, discusses the issues related to health systems and an ageing population.

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  • 24-April-2015

    English, PDF, 864kb

    Strengthening Public Employment Services

    Public employment services are increasingly important in government efforts to tackle unemployment and boost overall employment outcomes. To strengthen their contributions to this agenda, they require strong capacity and resources to activate job seekers, build connections with employers, and stimulate economic development.

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  • 15-April-2015

    English

    OECD Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector

    The OECD launched a project on “Benchmarking ICTs in health systems”, a multi-stakeholder initiative to improve the availability and quality of health ICT data through the development of a robust measurement framework and comparable cross-national measures. This task was accomplished in 2013 with the publication of an OECD “Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector”.

  • 14-avril-2015

    Français

    La charge fiscale sur les salaires s’accroît dans la zone OCDE alors même que les taux d’imposition n’ont pas augmenté

    Les impôts sur les salaires du travailleur moyen ont augmenté d’environ 1 point de pourcentage entre 2010 et 2014 dans les pays de l’OCDE,, alors même que dans la majorité des pays, le taux légal de l’impôt sur le revenu n’a pas été relevé, selon un nouveau rapport publié par l’OCDE.

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  • 27-March-2015

    English

    Ageing and Employment Policies: Poland 2015

    People today are living longer than ever before, while birth rates are dropping in the majority of OECD countries. Such demographics raise the question: are current public social expenditures adequate and sustainable? Older workers play a crucial role in the labour market. Now that legal retirement ages are rising, fewer older workers are retiring early, but at the same time those older workers who have lost their job after the age of 50 have tended to remain in long term unemployment. What can countries do to help? How can they give older people better work incentives and opportunities? These reports offer analysis and assessment on what the best policies are for fostering employability, job mobility and labour demand at an older age.

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  • 13-March-2015

    English

    Addressing Dementia - The OECD Response

    The large and growing human and financial cost of dementia provides an imperative for policy action. It is already the second largest cause of disability for the over-70s and it costs $645bn per year globally, and ageing populations mean that these costs will grow.

    There is no cure or effective treatment for dementia, and too often people do not get appropriate health and care services, leading to a poor quality of life. Our failure to tackle these issues provides a compelling illustration of some of today’s most pressing policy challenges. We need to rethink our research an innovation model, since progress on dementia has stalled and investment is just a fraction of what it is for other diseases of similar importance and profile. But even then a cure will be decades away, so we need better policies to improve the lives of people living with dementia now. Communities need to adjust to become more accommodating of people with dementia and families who provide informal care must be better supported. Formal care services and care institutions need to promote dignity and independence, while coordination of health and care services must be improved. But there is hope: if we can harness big data we may be able to address the gaps in our knowledge around treatment and care.
     

  • 10-mars-2015

    Français

    Investir dans la jeunesse en Tunisie - Renforcer l'employabilité des jeunes pendant la transition vers une économie verte

    Ce rapport présente un diagnostic détaillé du marché du travail des jeunes en Tunisie, en prêtant une attention particulière à la formation professionnelle et à l’entrepreneuriat et en se plaçant dans le contexte de la transition de la Tunisie vers une économie verte. Il opte pour une perspective comparative internationale dans son analyse des différents moyens d’améliorer le passage de l’école au travail. Il offre aussi à d’autres pays la possibilité de tirer des enseignements des mesures novatrices prises par la Tunisie pour renforcer les compétences des jeunes et leurs résultats en matière d’emploi.
     

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