Latest Documents


  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 317kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in the Slovak Republic

    In the Slovak Republic, students can access medical education after having completed high school and having passed a university entrance examination. Since 2003, Slovakian medical schools are under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Sport, which also determines the financial resources available to them.

    Related Documents
  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 301kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Germany

    In Germany, there are two main categories of nurses, first level and second level. A majority of first level nurses are trained through a 3-year vocational training programme involving hospital-based training, and these nurses can go on to pursue further education and training to specialise within the hospital setting.

    Related Documents
  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 325kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in Germany

    There are 37 faculties of medicine in Germany offering medical education, including a private university. Admission to medical studies remains highly competitive. In 2011, 37,400 students applied but only 9,432 students were admitted (roughly one out of four).

    Related Documents
  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 388kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Italy

    In Italy, there are two main categories of nurses requiring a university bachelor’s degree: Registered Nurses (RN) and Registered Paediatric Nurses (RPN). Once a Registered Nurse or a RPN, nurses can pursue further education in the form of a Master’s or Doctoral degree, which is more oriented towards an academic career.

    Related Documents
  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 326kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Australia

    In Australia, there are two main categories for nurses: Enrolled Nurses (EN) (who, after an additional 6 months of studies, can become Endorsed Enrolled Nurses (EEN)) and Registered Nurses (RN). Graduates from RN programmes can pursue further education and training to become Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) or Nurse Practitioners (NP).

    Related Documents
  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 315kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Canada

    In Canada, there are three main categories for nurses: Licenced Practice Nurses (LPNs), Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPNs). In addition, registered nurses can pursue further education to become Clinical Nurse Specialists and/or Nurse Practitioners.

    Related Documents
  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 324kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in the United Kingdom

    To become a doctor in the UK, on average, a student can expect between 10 to 15 years of university education and post-graduate training.

    Related Documents
  • 14-March-2016

    English

    Social Benefit Recipients Database (SOCR)

    The OECD’s Social Benefit Recipients Database (SOCR) presents comparable information on the number of people receiving cash benefits. SOCR includes data for the main income replacement programmes in the unemployment, social assistance, disability and old-age branches. It currently covers six years (2007-2012) for most OECD and EU countries.

    Related Documents
  • 3-March-2016

    English

    Taking a place-based approach to employment and skills strategies

    Regional disparities in the supply and demand of skills do exists in many OECD countries. Local level actors need to be equipped with the right tools and capacities to develop innovative employment and job creation strategies tailored to their local conditions.

    Related Documents
  • 29-February-2016

    English, PDF, 547kb

    Overview of Health Policy in Belgium

    Belgium shows average health outcomes compared to other OECD countries. Life expectancy at birth is 80.7 years, just above the OECD average. Quality of care is fair, standing again near the OECD average. Health expenditure at 10.2% of GDP is higher than the OECD average of 1.3% points in 2013. Health policy in Belgium relies on shared responsibility of both the federal authorities and federated entities (regions and communities).

    Related Documents
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 > >>