Latest Documents


  • 22-March-2016

    English

    Mark Keese speaks to the Worklife Hub about OECD’s new initiative on the Future of Work.

    Openness to change and a continuous questioning of the way we work are the keys to being prepared for the Future of Work. This advice comes from Mark Keese, Head of the Employment Analysis and Policy Division at the OECD, and we catch up with Mark following the OECD's Future of Work Forum in January 2016.

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  • 16-March-2016

    English

    Measuring skills shortages in real time

    Discussion on how technology helps measuring skills shortages in real time

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  • 3-March-2016

    English

    Taking a place-based approach to employment and skills strategies

    Regional disparities in the supply and demand of skills do exists in many OECD countries. Local level actors need to be equipped with the right tools and capacities to develop innovative employment and job creation strategies tailored to their local conditions.

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  • 25-February-2016

    English

    The role of cognitive skills in explaining wage differentials between socio-economic groups

    Average wages can vary markedly between socio-economic groups (gender, native- and foreign-born; high-skilled and low-skilled parents; workers of different ethnicities; age). These differences between groups of workers contribute to high overall wage inequality.

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  • 18-February-2016

    English

    Investing in youth is key for fixing Latvia’s demographics

    Latvia faces a huge demographic challenge. Since restoration of its independence in 1991, the country lost more than a quarter of its resident population.The report "Investing in Youth: Latvia" states that investing in youth, by upgrading skills and promoting employment, is a priority if Latvia wants to offer its young people a positive outlook and address the demographic challenge.

  • 10-February-2016

    English

    Youth unemployment in Tunisia: The need to invest in and activate skills is greater than ever

    Investing in Youth in Tunisia most important than ever, and the still relevance of the last Investing in Youth review 2014.

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  • 5-February-2016

    English

    Skills for growth: human capital composition and economic performance

    Skills for growth: human capital composition and economic performance

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  • 29-January-2016

    English

    Back to the future of work

    Back to the future of work, policy discussion at the Forum on the Future of Work and Labour Ministerial, 14 and 15 January 2016.

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  • 21-January-2016

    English

    What future for work in a digitised world?

    The digital revolution, globalisation and rapid population ageing are changing profoundly the types of jobs needed and the way we work, and may lead to even more dramatic changes over the coming decades. Will the many unemployed ever find a job again with the skills they have today in new world of work? Where are new jobs being created and what do they look like?

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  • 20-January-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Colombia 2016

    Colombia has made major economic and social advances in recent years. The combination of strong economic growth and policies targeted at the most vulnerable groups improved considerably the living standards of the Colombian population. Today, the country enjoys higher employment and labour force participation rates than the average of OECD countries and unemployment is steadily declining. Nevertheless, despite these positive trends, deep structural problems remain. Labour informality is widespread, the rate of self-employment is high and many employees have non-regular contracts. Income inequality is higher than in any OECD country and redistribution through taxes and benefits is almost negligible. In addition, half a century of internal conflict and violence has displaced a significant part of the population, and many of them are living in extreme poverty. Despite considerable progress, violence continues to be a challenge and also affects trade union members and leaders. The Colombian Government has undertaken important reforms in recent years to address these labour market and social challenges, and the efforts are gradually paying off. However, further progress is needed to enhance the quality of jobs and well-being for all. The main trust of this report is to support the Colombian Government in tackling labour market duality, generate trust between the social partners, develop inclusive and active social policies, and get the most out of international migration.

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