By Date


  • 12-July-2016

    English

  • 8-July-2016

    English

    What does country average mean (OECD Education Today Blog)

    The international statistical system, one of the great achievements of international organisations, has mirrored the evolution of the nation-state.

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  • 7-July-2016

    English

    How to transform schools into learning organisations? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Schools nowadays are required to learn faster than ever before in order to deal effectively with the growing pressures of a rapidly changing environment.

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  • 7-July-2016

    English, PDF, 1,423kb

    What makes a school a learning organisation? (A guide for policy makers, school leaders and teachers)

    Today’s schools must equip students with the knowledge and skills they’ll need to succeed in an uncertain, constantly changing tomorrow. But many schools look much the same today as they did a generation ago, and too many teachers are not developing the pedagogies and practices required to meet the diverse needs of 21st-century learners.

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  • 30-June-2016

    English

    2016 Skills Summit opening remarks

    Looking ahead to today’s discussions, we want to hear about your experiences in developing national skills strategies. What have you done to create and sustain a national dialogue on skills? How has your country leveraged investment in skills to achieve sustainable growth and social inclusion? We also need to ask ourselves why, with all that we know about the importance of developing skills, do we struggle so much to make more progress?

  • 29-June-2016

    English

    2016 Skills Summit welcome remarks

    When you invest in skills, you invest directly in people. When you improve skills, you lift people. The OECD will continue to mobilise and strengthen its capacity, networks, and comparative data on skills so that, together, we can design, deliver and implement better skills policies for better lives.

  • 29-June-2016

    English

    Archived webinar with Andreas Schleicher, Director of the OECD Directorate for Education and Skills, presenting the findings of Skills Matter - Further Results from the Survey of Adult Skills

    The Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), was designed to provide insights into the availability of some of these key skills in society and how they are used at work and at home.

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  • 28-June-2016

    English

    Why skills matter (OECD Education Today Blog)

    It’s the time of year when young people in the northern hemisphere are finishing their formal studies for the year – or for the foreseeable future.

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  • 28-juin-2016

    Français

    Il faut améliorer les compétences pour bâtir des sociétés plus justes et plus inclusives

    Outre qu’il limite considérablement les possibilités d’accéder à un emploi mieux rémunéré et plus gratifiant, le manque de compétences a d’importantes répercussions sur la manière dont les fruits de la croissance économique sont partagés dans la société.

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  • 28-June-2016

    English

    The Survey of Adult Skills - Reader's Companion, Second Edition

    In the wake of the technological revolution that began in the last decades of the 20th century, labour market demand for information-processing and other high-level cognitive and interpersonal skills is growing substantially. The Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), was designed to provide insights into the availability of some of these key skills in society and how they are used at work and at home. The first survey of its kind, it directly measures proficiency in several information-processing skills – namely literacy, numeracy and problem solving in technology-rich environments.

    The Survey of Adult Skills: Reader’s Companion, Second Edition describes the design and methodology of the survey and its relationship to other international assessments of young students and adults. It is a companion volume to Skills Matter: Further Results from the Survey of Adult Skills. Skills Matter reports results from the 24 countries and regions that participated in the first round of the survey in 2011-12 (first published in OECD Skills Outlook 2013: First Results from the Survey of Adult Skills) and from the nine additional countries that participated in the second round in 2014-15 (Chile, Greece, Indonesia [Jakarta], Israel, Lithuania, New Zealand, Singapore, Slovenia and Turkey).

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