By Date


  • 20-September-2016

    English

    School Leadership for Learning - Insights from TALIS 2013

    The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) is the largest international survey of teachers and school leaders. Using the TALIS database, this report looks at different approaches to school leadership and the impact of school leadership on professional learning communities and on the learning climate in individual schools.

    It looks at principals’ instructional and distributed leadership across different education systems and levels. Instructional leadership comprises leadership practices that involve the planning, evaluation, co-ordination and improvement of teaching and learning. Distributed leadership in schools explores the degree of involvement of staff, parents or guardians, and students in school decisions.

    How are principals’ and schools’ characteristics related to instructional and distributed leadership? What types of leadership are favoured across countries? What impact do they have on the establishment of professional learning communities and positive learning environments? The report notes that teacher collaboration is more common in schools with strong instructional leadership. However, about one in three principals does not actively encourage collaboration among the teaching staff in his or her school. There is room for improvement; and both policy and practice can help achieve it. The report offers a series of policy recommendations to help strengthen school leadership.

  • 20-September-2016

    English

    Archived webinar - School Leadership for Learning: Insights from TALIS 2013 (September 20, 2016)

    Archived webinar - School Leadership for Learning: Insights from TALIS 2013 (September 20, 2016)

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  • 16-September-2016

    English

    Archived webinar of September 15,2016 with Andreas Schleicher, Director for Education and Skills, OECD, presenting the findings of Education at a Glance 2016.

    Archived webinar of September 15,2016 with Andreas Schleicher, Director for Education and Skills, OECD, presenting the findings of Education at a Glance 2016.

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  • 15-September-2016

    English

    Launch of Education at a Glance 2016

    Education remains a key driver of individual well-being, social progress and inclusive growth. The evidence presented in Education at a Glance 2016 is overwhelming ─ employment, earnings, health outcomes, and life satisfaction are all closely linked to educational attainment and skills.

  • 15-septembre-2016

    Français

    L’Objectif de développement durable portant sur l’éducation représente, pour tous les pays, un véritable défi à atteindre d’ici à 2030

    Les pays de l'OCDE doivent redoubler d’efforts pour améliorer la qualité de leurs systèmes d’éducation et les rendre plus égalitaires, conformément à leur engagement à atteindre l’Objectif de développement durable (ODD) relatif à l’éducation d’ici à 2030, selon un nouveau rapport de l'OCDE.

    Documents connexes
  • 12-September-2016

    English

    Investing in Youth: Australia

    The present report on Australia is part of the series on "Investing in Youth", which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the area of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on disengaged or at-risk of disengaged youth.

  • 9-September-2016

    English

    What makes education governance and reform work beyond the drawing table? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Today’s education systems need to adapt practices to local diversity while ensuring common goals.

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  • 9-September-2016

    English

    Education Governance in Action - Lessons from Case Studies

    Governing multi-level education systems requires governance models that balance responsiveness to local diversity with the ability to ensure national objectives. This delicate equilibrium is difficult to achieve given the complexity of many education systems. Countries are therefore increasingly looking for examples of good practice and models of effective modern governance that they can adapt to their own needs.

    Education Governance in Action: Lessons from Case Studies bridges theory and practice by connecting major themes in education governance to real-life reform efforts in a variety of countries. It builds upon in-depth case studies of education reform efforts in Flanders (Belgium), Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Sweden. The case studies are complemented by country examples of efforts to restore and sustain trust in their education systems. Together they provide a rich illustration of modern governance challenges - and successes.

    The volume highlights the importance of the interdependence between knowledge and governance and focuses on essential components for modern education governance: accountability, capacity building and strategic thinking. It sets the agenda for thinking about the flexible and adaptive systems necessary for governing education in today's complex world. This publication will be of interest to policy makers, education leaders, teachers, the education research community and all those interested in education governance and complexity.

  • 6-September-2016

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 65 - Should all students be taught complex mathematics?

    Exposure to complex mathematics concepts and tasks is related to higher performance in PISA among all students, including socio-economically disadvantaged students.

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  • 6-September-2016

    English

    Complex mathematics isn’t for everyone (but maybe it should be) (OECD Education Today Blog)

    PISA 2012 finds that, on average across OECD countries, about 70% of students attend schools where teachers believe that it is best to adapt academic standards to students’ capacities and needs.

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