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  • 10-February-2016

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 60: Who are the low-performing students?

    No country or economy participating in PISA 2012 can claim that all of its 15-year-old students have achieved basic proficiency skills in mathematics, reading and science. Some 28% of students score below the baseline level of proficiency in at least one of those subjects, on average across OECD countries

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  • 10-February-2016

    English

    Are we failing our failing students? (OECD Education&Skills Today Blog)

    A new PISA report, Low-Performing Students: Why They Fall Behind and How to Help Them Succeed, offers an in-depth analysis of low performance at school and recommends ways to tackle the problem.

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  • 10-February-2016

    English

    Low-Performing Students - Why They Fall Behind and How To Help Them Succeed

    There is no country or economy participating in PISA 2012 that can claim that all of its 15-year-old students have achieved a baseline level of proficiency in mathematics, reading and science. Poor performance at school has long-term consequences, both for the individual and for society as a whole.  Reducing the number of low-performing students is not only a goal in its own right but also an effective way to improve an education system’s overall performance – and equity, since low performers are disproportionately from socio-economically disadvantaged families.

    Low-performing Students: Why they Fall Behind and How to Help them Succeed examines low performance at school by looking at low performers’ family background, education career and attitudes towards school. The report also analyses the school practices and educational policies that are more strongly associated with poor student performance. Most important, the evidence provided in the report reveals what policy makers, educators, parents and students themselves can do to tackle low performance and succeed in school.

  • 8-February-2016

    English

    On target for 21st-century learning? The answers (and questions) are now on line. (OECD Education&Skills Today Blog)

    School leaders are calling the PISA-based Test for Schools one of the better indicators out there of how well students are prepared for 21st century learning.

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  • 2-February-2016

    English

    Archived webinar - Low-performing Students: Why they Fall Behind and How to Help them Succeed (February 10, 2016) with Andreas Schleicher, Director for Education and Skills, OECD, and Daniel Salinas, Analyst, OECD.

    Archived webinar - Low-performing Students: Why they Fall Behind and How to Help them Succeed (February 10, 2016) with Andreas Schleicher, Director for Education and Skills, OECD, and Daniel Salinas, Analyst, OECD.

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  • 2-February-2016

    English

    Archived Webinar - Supporting Teacher Professionalism. (Friday, 12 February 2016, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.)

    Archived Webinar - Friday, 12 February 2016, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (ET) - The Alliance for Excellent Education and the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future (NCTAF) joined forces with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to host a joint U.S. release of the OECD’s new report Supporting Teacher Professionalism.

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  • 31-January-2016

    English, PDF, 297kb

    Israel Policy Brief: Improving Vocational Education and Training for More Equity and Growth

    Israel’s economy is threatened by a series of serious skills shortages arising from a retirement wave among highly-skilled migrants.

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  • 28-January-2016

    English

    Why do we bother with qualifications? (OECD Education&Skills Today Blog)

    Qualifications are useful because they make skills visible. It is confidently assumed that the holder of a school-leaving certificate can read and understand instructions, and make calculations, and that those with university degrees can do much more.

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  • 28-January-2016

    English, PDF, 2,371kb

    Building Skills for All - A Review of England

    There are an estimated 9 million working aged adults in England (more than a quarter of adults aged 16-65) with low literacy or numeracy skills or both. This reflects England’s overall performance in the Survey of Adult Skills - around average for literacy, but well below average for numeracy relative to other OECD countries in the Survey (OECD, 2013).

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  • 25-janvier-2016

    Français

    Guide opérationnel CITE 2011 - Directives pour la classification des programmes éducatifs nationaux et des certifications correspondantes

    La structure des systèmes éducatifs varie énormément d’un pays à l’autre. Afin de produire des statistiques et des indicateurs comparables à l’échelle internationale, il est nécessaire de disposer d’un cadre permettant de collecter et de soumettre des données sur des programmes éducatifs avec un contenu éducatif de niveau similaire. La Classification internationale type de l’Éducation (CITE) de l’UNESCO est la classification de référence permettant d’organiser les programmes éducatifs et les certifications correspondantes par niveau d’éducation et par domaines d’études. Les définitions et les concepts fondamentaux de la CITE ont été établis de manière à être internationalement valides et applicables à l’ensemble des systèmes éducatifs.

    La CITE 2011 est la deuxième révision importante de cette classification (élaborée initialement dans les années 70 et révisée pour la première fois en 1997). Elle a été adoptée par la Conférence générale de l’UNESCO en novembre 2011. Préparé conjointement par l’Institut de statistique de l’UNESCO (ISU), l’OCDE et Eurostat, ce guide opérationnel fournit des directives et notes explicatives pour l’interprétation de la classification révisée, par niveau éducatif. Il présente également des exemples nationaux de programmes et de certifications correspondantes classés dans la CITE 2011.

    Ce guide sera utile aux statisticiens nationaux qui collectent et soumettent des données d’éducation aux organisations internationales, ainsi qu’aux décideurs politiques et aux chercheurs intéressés par une meilleure compréhension de ces données.

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