Latest Documents


  • 15-May-2017

    English

    Who benefits when international students pay higher tuition fees? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    In 2014, over 3 million students in OECD countries – more than double the amount in 2000 – were studying outside their country of citizenship.

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  • 15-May-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 51 - Tuition fee reforms and international mobility

    In most countries with available data, public educational institutions charge different tuition fees for national and foreign students enrolled in the same programme. In Australia, Austria, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, foreign students pay on average about twice or more the tuition fees charged to national students.

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  • 4-May-2017

    English

    How to surf the new wave of globalisation (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Globalisation is connecting people, cities, countries and continents, bringing together a majority of the world’s population in ways that vastly increase our individual and collective potential, and creating an integrated market in products and services.

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  • 4-May-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Outlook 2017 - Skills and Global Value Chains

    Since the 1990s, the world has entered a new phase of globalisation. Information and communication technology, trade liberalisation and lower transport costs have enabled firms and countries to fragment the production process into global value chains (GVCs). Many products are now designed in one country and assembled in another country from parts manufactured in several countries. Thirty percent of the value of exports of OECD countries comes from abroad. In this new context, GVCs and skills are more closely interrelated than ever. Skills play a key role in determining countries’ comparative advantages in GVCs. A lot of the opportunities and challenges brought about by GVCs are being affected by countries’ skills.

    The OECD Skills Outlook 2017 shows how countries can make the most of global value chains, socially and economically, by investing in the skills of their populations. Applying a “whole of government” approach is crucial. Countries need to develop a consistent set of skills-related policies such as education, employment protection legislation, and migration policies, in coordination with trade and innovation policies. This report presents new analyses based on the Survey of Adult Skills and the Trade in Value Added Database. It also explains what countries would need to do to specialise in technologically advanced industries.

  • 20-April-2017

    English

    Working together to build the culture of learning in the Netherlands (OECD Education Today Blog)

    The Netherlands’ economy and society are being transformed by technological change, increased economic integration, population ageing, increased migration and other pressures.

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  • 20-April-2017

    English

    The Netherlands should step up its efforts to give people the skills needed to thrive in an increasingly interconnected and rapidly changing world, according to a new OECD report.

    The Dutch education system and the skills of the Dutch population are very strong overall. But there are concerns that too many people in the Netherlands are not developing the “right” skills to succeed or taking sufficient responsibility for maintaining and further developing their skills in adulthood.

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  • 11-April-2017

    English

    Does the world need people who understand problems, or who can solve them? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    A recently published OECD publication, The Nature of Problem Solving: Using Research to Inspire 21st Century Learning, explores the concept of problem solving in great depth.

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  • 6-April-2017

    English

    Building tax systems to foster better skills (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Investing in skills is crucial for fostering inclusive economic growth and creating strong societies. In an increasingly connected world, skills are particularly important for citizens to get the most out of new forms of capital, such as big data and robotics.

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  • 28-March-2017

    English

    Adult Skills in Focus No. 5: Do socio-economic disparities in skills grow between the teenage years and young adulthood?

    The striking cross-national variation in socio-economic disparities in skills gaps among 15-year-olds, and the evolution of these gaps between the ages of 15 and 27, raises the question of what policies and institutional arrangements may explain such variability.

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  • 27-January-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 48 - A snapshot of 50 years of trends in expanding education

    Countries have seen a major increase in the educational attainment level of their populations. In 1965, only 43% of young adults aged 25-34 had attained upper secondary education or higher on average across OECD countries. Fifty years later, upper secondary education had almost doubled with attainment levels reaching 84% in 2015.

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