Latest Documents


  • 4-May-2018

    English

    Skills Strategy Implementation Guidance for Portugal - Strengthening the Adult-Learning System

    Raising skills is critical to Portugal’s economic success and social well-being. As globalisation and digitalisation are transforming how people work, how societies function and how individuals interact, Portugal needs to equip its entire population with strong skills so that they can benefit from new opportunities.Portugal has put education and skills at the forefront of the political agenda for many years, but more than half of adults have not completed upper secondary education. With the population ageing rapidly and a growing skills divide between generations, Portugal needs to further strengthen its adult-learning system. To make change happen, Portugal will need a clear vision for the adult-learning system and a strong partnership between all stakeholders – all levels of government, education and training providers, employers, trade unions, the non-profit sector and learners.This report outlines areas where the accessibility, flexibility and quality of the adult-learning system can be improved, where governance and financing mechanisms can be strengthened, and provides examples of international and national good practice to help achieve these objectives. The report provides a series of concrete actions to help Portugal improve the adult-learning system and in turn enhance economic growth and social cohesion.
  • 11-April-2018

    English

    Apprenticeship in England, United Kingdom

    One of a series of studies on vocational education and training, this review focuses on the apprenticeship system in England and concludes with policy recommendations.England has launched a series of reforms that champion the institution of apprenticeship, and address some previous weaknesses. The reforms encourage more substantive apprenticeship programmes and a stronger funding framework. Despite these strengths, there is still some way to go to establish an apprenticeship system in England to match those of the strongest countries.This report suggests several ways in which reforms might be adapted to achieve higher quality and better outcomes. An effective apprenticeship system involves various elements such as the development of the apprentice in the workplace by the employer and the broader education of young apprentices. The report argues that England should consider introducing regulations and standards to ensure that these elements are part of all apprenticeship programmes, and that the recently introduced apprenticeship levy supports high-quality training. In comparison to other countries, England has relatively few young apprentices. The report suggests England could facilitate transition from school to work by making better use of apprenticeships targeting school leavers.
  • 1-February-2018

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 58 - How do primary and secondary teachers compare?

    While policy debate is often focused on the whole teaching profession, primary and secondary teachers differ in more ways than one. While all countries require teachers to have at least a bachelor degree to enter the profession in primary or lower secondary education, the structure and content of the programmes vary and are less geared towards practice at secondary than primary level.

    Related Documents
  • 1-February-2018

    English

    Learning for careers: The career pathways movement in the United States (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Learning needs vary as we evolve through life. The early years of education set the stage for children’s well-being, cognitive and social-emotional development; young children starting out in the world require stability, reassurance, and encouragement, and need a warm and caring teacher.

    Related Documents
  • 31-January-2018

    English

    Shaping, not predicting, the future of students (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Footballer Cristiano Ronaldo is reputed to have once said that there’s no point making predictions because nothing is set in stone. It is hard to predict the future, but in education policy at least it is not altogether impossible.

    Related Documents
  • 21-December-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 57: Is labour market demand keeping pace with the rising educational attainment of the population?

    Across OECD countries, more and more individuals have attained tertiary education and the share of those with less education has declined. Although there are more tertiary-educated individuals than ever before, they still achieve good labour market outcomes.

    Related Documents
  • 4-December-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus No. 56: Who really bears the cost of education? How the burden of education expenditure shifts from the public to the private

    Despite the obvious benefits derived from education, governments face difficult trade-offs when balancing the share of public and private contributions to education.

    Related Documents
  • 4-December-2017

    English

    Who really bears the cost of education? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    It can be difficult to get your head around education finance. Who actually pays for it, where does the money come from, and how is it spent are all crucial questions to ask if you want to understand how the money flows in education.

    Related Documents
  • 20-novembre-2017

    Français

    Perspectives de l'OCDE sur les compétences 2017 - Compétences et chaînes de valeur mondiales

    Depuis les années 90, le monde est entré dans une nouvelle phase de la mondialisation. Les technologies de l’information et des communications, la libéralisation des échanges et la baisse des coûts de transport ont permis aux entreprises et aux pays de segmenter le processus de production en chaînes de valeur mondiales (CVM). De nombreux produits sont désormais conçus dans un pays et assemblés dans un autre, à partir de pièces fabriquées dans plusieurs pays. Trente pour cent de la valeur des exportations des pays de l’OCDE proviennent de l’étanger. Dans ce nouveau contexte, les CVM et les compétences sont plus étroitement liées que jamais. Les compétences jouent un rôle clé dans la caractérisation des avantages comparatifs des pays dans les CVM. Nombre des opportunités et des défis induits par les CVM sont déterminés par les compétences de chaque pays.L’édition 2017 des Perspectives de l’OCDE sur les compétences montre comment les pays peuvent tirer pleinement parti des chaînes de valeur mondiales, sur les plans économique et social, en investissant dans les compétences de leur population. Il est essentiel à cet égard d’adopter une approche interministérielle. Les pays doivent mettre au point un ensemble cohérent de politiques en lien avec les compétences, telles que la politique éducative, la législation sur la protection de l’emploi et la politique migratoire, en coordination avec la politique commerciale et la politique de l’innovation. Ce rapport présente de nouvelles analyses à partir de l’Enquête sur les compétences des adultes et de la base de données sur les échanges en valeur ajoutée. Il explique également ce que les pays devraient faire pour se spécialiser dans des secteurs d’activité technologiquement avancés.
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 17-November-2017

    English

    How much will the literacy level of working-age people change from now to 2022? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Taken as a whole, the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) present a mixed picture for Korea and Singapore. As their economies have grown, these two countries’ education systems have seen fast and impressive improvements; both now rank among PISA’s top performers.

    Related Documents
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>