Latest Documents


  • 13-June-2017

    English

    Starting Strong V - Transitions from Early Childhood Education and Care to Primary Education

    The transition from early childhood education to primary school is a big step for all children, and a step which more and more children are having to take. Quality transitions are well-prepared and child-centred, managed by trained staff collaborating with one another, and guided by an appropriate and aligned curriculum. They enhance the likelihood that the positive impacts of early learning and care will last through primary school and beyond.  While transition policies have been on the agenda of many countries over the past decade, little research has been done into how OECD countries design, implement, manage and monitor transitions. Filling these gaps is important for designing early years’ policies that are coherent, equitable and sustainable.

    This report takes stock of and compares the situation across 30 OECD and partner countries, drawing on in-depth country reports and a questionnaire on transition policies and practices. It focuses on the organisation and governance of transitions; and the policies and strategies to ensure professional, pedagogical and developmental continuity between early childhood education and care settings and schools. The report describes the main policy challenges highlighted by participating countries, along with a wealth of practical strategies for tackling them. The publication concludes with six “cross-cutting” pointers to guide future policy development.

  • 24-May-2017

    English

    PISA 2015 Results (Volume IV) - Students' Financial Literacy

    The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) examines not just what students know in science, reading and mathematics, but what they can do with what they know. Results from PISA show educators and policy makers the quality and equity of learning outcomes achieved elsewhere, and allow them to learn from the policies and practices applied in other countries. PISA 2015 Results (Volume IV): Students’ Financial Literacy, is one of five volumes that present the results of the PISA 2015 survey, the sixth round of the triennial assessment. It explores students’ experience with and knowledge about money and provides an overall picture of 15-year-olds’ ability to apply their accumulated knowledge and skills to real-life situations involving financial issues and decisions.

    Over the past decades, developed and emerging countries and economies have become increasingly concerned about the level of financial literacy of their citizens, particularly among young people. This initially stemmed from concern about the potential impact of shrinking public and private welfare systems, shifting demographics, including the ageing of the population in many countries, and the increased sophistication and expansion of financial services. Many young people face financial decisions and are consumers of financial services in this evolving context. As a result, financial literacy is now globally recognised as an essential life skill.

  • 9-May-2017

    English

    Do new teachers feel prepared for teaching? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    One of the greatest challenge for new teachers, does not come from not knowing what to teach, but from not knowing how to teach what they know and how to manage a classroom in all its strange and exciting complexity.

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  • 9-May-2017

    English

    Teaching in Focus No. 17: “Do new teachers feel prepared for teaching?”

    New teachers are more likely to feel prepared in the content of their subject field(s), rather than the pedagogy or classroom practice of their subject field(s).

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  • 3-May-2017

    English

    Assessing school assessment in Romania (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Romania has been one of Europe’s success stories in terms of delivering improved results. Over the past decade, only Portugal has seen faster improvement in our PISA science assessment than Romania.

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  • 3-May-2017

    English

    Newsroom - Strengthening evaluation and assessment in Romania is key to educational reform

    Romania’s education system has made significant progress in recent decades, strengthening institutions and improving students’ learning outcomes. But while a minority of Romanian students excel, nearly 40% of 15 year-olds still do not master basic skills according to PISA 2015 and almost 20% leave school before completing upper secondary education.

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  • 3-May-2017

    English

    Romania 2017

    Romania’s education system has made impressive strides over the past two decades, with an increasing share of students mastering the basic competencies that they need for life and work. But these average improvements mask significant disparities in learning outcomes and attainment, with an increasing share of students leaving education early without basic skills. This review, developed in cooperation with UNICEF, provides Romania with recommendations to help strengthen its evaluation and assessment system, by reducing the weight of high stake examinations and creating more space for the formative discussions and feedback that are integral to improving learning and teaching. It will be of interest to Romania, as well as other countries looking to make more effective use of their evaluation and assessment system to improve quality and equity, and result in better outcomes for all students.

  • 19-April-2017

    English

    Archived webinar - PISA Q&A Webinar - New Data and Insights from PISA on Students' Well Being

    with Andreas Schleicher, Director for the Directorate of Education and Skills

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  • 19-April-2017

    English

    PISA 2015 Results (Volume III) - Students' Well-Being

    The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) examines not just what students know in science, reading and mathematics, but what they can do with what they know. Results from PISA show educators and policy makers the quality and equity of learning outcomes achieved elsewhere, and allow them to learn from the policies and practices applied in other countries. PISA 2015 Results (Volume III): Students’ Well-Being, is one of five volumes that present the results of the PISA 2015 survey, the sixth round of the triennial assessment. It explores a comprehensive set of well-being indicators for adolescents that covers both negative outcomes (e.g. anxiety, low performance) and the positive impulses that promote healthy development (e.g. interest, engagement, motivation to achieve).

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in the classroom: following lessons, socialising with classmates, and interacting with teachers and other staff members. What happens in school – as well as at home – is therefore key to understanding whether students enjoy good physical and mental health, how happy and satisfied they are with different aspects of their life, how connected to others they feel, and the aspirations they have for their future.

  • 19-April-2017

    English

    Learning in school as a social activity (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Happy schools are places where children feel challenged but competent, where they work hard but enjoy it, where social relationships are rewarding and respectful, and where academic achievement is the product but not the sole objective.

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