Latest Documents


  • 4-May-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Outlook 2017 - Skills and Global Value Chains

    Since the 1990s, the world has entered a new phase of globalisation. Information and communication technology, trade liberalisation and lower transport costs have enabled firms and countries to fragment the production process into global value chains (GVCs). Many products are now designed in one country and assembled in another country from parts manufactured in several countries. Thirty percent of the value of exports of OECD countries comes from abroad. In this new context, GVCs and skills are more closely interrelated than ever. Skills play a key role in determining countries’ comparative advantages in GVCs. A lot of the opportunities and challenges brought about by GVCs are being affected by countries’ skills.

    The OECD Skills Outlook 2017 shows how countries can make the most of global value chains, socially and economically, by investing in the skills of their populations. Applying a “whole of government” approach is crucial. Countries need to develop a consistent set of skills-related policies such as education, employment protection legislation, and migration policies, in coordination with trade and innovation policies. This report presents new analyses based on the Survey of Adult Skills and the Trade in Value Added Database. It also explains what countries would need to do to specialise in technologically advanced industries.

  • 3-May-2017

    English

    Assessing school assessment in Romania (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Romania has been one of Europe’s success stories in terms of delivering improved results. Over the past decade, only Portugal has seen faster improvement in our PISA science assessment than Romania.

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  • 3-May-2017

    English

    Newsroom - Strengthening evaluation and assessment in Romania is key to educational reform

    Romania’s education system has made significant progress in recent decades, strengthening institutions and improving students’ learning outcomes. But while a minority of Romanian students excel, nearly 40% of 15 year-olds still do not master basic skills according to PISA 2015 and almost 20% leave school before completing upper secondary education.

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  • 3-May-2017

    English

    Romania 2017

    Romania’s education system has made impressive strides over the past two decades, with an increasing share of students mastering the basic competencies that they need for life and work. But these average improvements mask significant disparities in learning outcomes and attainment, with an increasing share of students leaving education early without basic skills. This review, developed in cooperation with UNICEF, provides Romania with recommendations to help strengthen its evaluation and assessment system, by reducing the weight of high stake examinations and creating more space for the formative discussions and feedback that are integral to improving learning and teaching. It will be of interest to Romania, as well as other countries looking to make more effective use of their evaluation and assessment system to improve quality and equity, and result in better outcomes for all students.

  • 20-April-2017

    English

    Working together to build the culture of learning in the Netherlands (OECD Education Today Blog)

    The Netherlands’ economy and society are being transformed by technological change, increased economic integration, population ageing, increased migration and other pressures.

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  • 20-April-2017

    English

    The Netherlands should step up its efforts to give people the skills needed to thrive in an increasingly interconnected and rapidly changing world, according to a new OECD report.

    The Dutch education system and the skills of the Dutch population are very strong overall. But there are concerns that too many people in the Netherlands are not developing the “right” skills to succeed or taking sufficient responsibility for maintaining and further developing their skills in adulthood.

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  • 19-April-2017

    English

    Archived webinar - PISA Q&A Webinar - New Data and Insights from PISA on Students' Well Being

    with Andreas Schleicher, Director for the Directorate of Education and Skills

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  • 19-April-2017

    English

    PISA 2015 Results (Volume III) - Students' Well-Being

    The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) examines not just what students know in science, reading and mathematics, but what they can do with what they know. Results from PISA show educators and policy makers the quality and equity of learning outcomes achieved elsewhere, and allow them to learn from the policies and practices applied in other countries. PISA 2015 Results (Volume III): Students’ Well-Being, is one of five volumes that present the results of the PISA 2015 survey, the sixth round of the triennial assessment. It explores a comprehensive set of well-being indicators for adolescents that covers both negative outcomes (e.g. anxiety, low performance) and the positive impulses that promote healthy development (e.g. interest, engagement, motivation to achieve).

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in the classroom: following lessons, socialising with classmates, and interacting with teachers and other staff members. What happens in school – as well as at home – is therefore key to understanding whether students enjoy good physical and mental health, how happy and satisfied they are with different aspects of their life, how connected to others they feel, and the aspirations they have for their future.

  • 19-April-2017

    English

    Learning in school as a social activity (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Happy schools are places where children feel challenged but competent, where they work hard but enjoy it, where social relationships are rewarding and respectful, and where academic achievement is the product but not the sole objective.

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  • 14-April-2017

    English

    Country Roads: Education and Rural Life (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Some rural regions benefit today from their proximity to social and economic urban centres to attract people and enhance their economic competitiveness.

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