Latest Documents


  • 29-May-2013

    English

    What makes a NEET?

    NEETS - young people aged between 15 and 29 years old who are not in employment, education or training - are a potential problem both for society and for themselves. The proportion of young people neither working nor studying offers an insight into how well economies manage the transition between school and work – better than youth unemployment rates, which do not take into account the numbers in education.

  • 28-May-2013

    English

    Working with youth: A series of case studies

    How are countries around the world helping youth stay in school, build skills and careers? What are they doing about youth unemployment? These case studies provide a starting point for those looking not only to learn about the problems facing youth today, but how to solve them.

  • 28-May-2013

    English

    Getting our youth back to work - by Andreas Schleicher, Deputy Director and Special Advisor on Education Policy to the OECD's Secretary-General

    If there’s one lesson we’ve learned over the past few years, it’s that we cannot simply bail ourselves out of a crisis, we cannot solely stimulate ourselves out of a crisis and we cannot just print money our way out of a crisis. But we can become much better in equipping more people with better skills to collaborate, compete and connect in ways that drive our economies forward.

  • 28-May-2013

    English, PDF, 2,688kb

    Education Indicators in Focus 13 - How difficult is it to move from school to work?

    In some countries, an increasing number of young people are neither in employment, nor in education or training (NEET). A high proportion of NEETs is an indicator of a difficult transition between school and work.

  • 28-May-2013

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Spotlight - Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives 03: Apprenticeships and Workplace Learning

    How do apprenticeships and other forms of workplace learning help people to make a successful transition from school to work? Global economic competition requires a labour force with a range of mid-level trade, technical and professional skills alongside the high-level skills typically associated with university education.

  • 14-May-2013

    English

    Video - Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education - Netherlands

    In a drive to raise the quality of classroom teaching and boost student performance, Dutch education authorities are encouraging teachers to learn from each other through a process of peer review.

  • 14-May-2013

    English

    Video - Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education - Belgium (Flanders)

    Flanders builds a "triangle of quality" based on extensive autonomy for schools, supported by pedagogical advisory services and monitored by government inspectors.

  • 7-May-2013

    English

    The “urban advantage” in education

    Nearly half the world’s population now lives in urban areas. What does that mean for education?

  • 29-April-2013

    English

    The OECD awards first Thomas J. Alexander Fellows for education quality and equity

    The OECD has named four researchers as the first Thomas J. Alexander Fellows: João Galvão Bacchetto, of Brazil; Przemysław Biecek of Poland; Gabriela Miranda Moriconi of Brazil; and William Schmidt of the United States.

  • 22-April-2013

    English

    Learning from other countries’ experiences in education -

    Rather than prescribe actions, the OECD often prefers to show policy makers what everyone else is doing and how successful those initiatives have been. A new OECD series of individual Education Policy Outlook Country Profiles does just that: each profile describes how an individual country is responding to key challenges to improve the effectiveness of its education system.

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