Latest Documents


  • 17-décembre-2015

    Français

    Garantir la qualité de l'enseignement supérieur transnational - Mise en œuvre des lignes directrices UNESCO/OCDE

    Au cours des dix dernières années, de nombreux pays ont conçu des politiques explicites d'internationalisation de leurs systèmes d'enseignement supérieur, reconnaissant les avantages d'une expérience internationale pour préparer les étudiants à une économie en pleine mondialisation, ainsi que les nombreuses opportunités crées par la mobilité transnationale en termes d'innovation, d'amélioration et de développement des capacités dans l'enseignement supérieur et dans l'économie dans son ensemble.

    Des cas de fraude et des comportements opportunistes ont cependant montré que ces promesses s’accompagnent de risques pour les étudiants et d’autres acteurs de l'enseignement tertiaire. C'est précisément dans le but d'aider toutes les parties prenantes à minimiser ces risques et à renforcer les dynamiques d'ouverture, de collaboration et de transparence entre les pays que l'UNESCO et l'OCDE ont développé ensemble leurs Lignes directrices pour des prestations de qualité dans l'enseignement supérieur transfontalier.

    Analysant dans quelle mesure les acteurs de l'enseignement supérieur se sont conformés à ces lignes directrices en 2014, cet ouvrage intéressera les décideurs, les directeurs d'établissements d'enseignement supérieur et les agences d'assurance qualité, ainsi que les universitaires et autres parties intéressées par l'enseignement supérieur et son internationalisation.

  • 15-December-2015

    English

    Improving Schools in Scotland: An OECD Perspective

    This report examines the ongoing development of education policy, practice and leadership in Scotland, by providing an independent review of the direction of the Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) and emerging impacts seen in quality and equity in Scottish schooling.

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  • 11-December-2015

    English

    OECD Education and Skills Newsletter - December 2015

    Bringing you the highlights from the OECD Directorate for Education and Skills

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  • 11-December-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of School Resources: Flemish Community of Belgium 2015

    The effective use of school resources is a policy priority across OECD countries. The OECD Reviews of School Resources explore how resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education.
    The series considers four types of resources: financial resources, such as public funding of individual schools; human resources, such as teachers, school leaders and education administrators; physical resources, such as location, buildings and equipment; and other resources such as learning time.
    This series offers timely policy advice to both governments and the education community. It includes both country reports and thematic studies.

  • 11-December-2015

    English

    A Review of International Large-Scale Assessments in Education - Assessing Component Skills and Collecting Contextual Data

    The OECD has initiated PISA for Development (PISA-D) in response to the rising need of developing countries to collect data about their education systems and the capacity of their student bodies. This report aims to compare and contrast approaches regarding the instruments that are used to collect data on (a) component skills and cognitive instruments, (b) contextual frameworks, and (c) the implementation of the different international assessments, as well as approaches to include children who are not at school, and the ways in which data are used. It then seeks to identify assessment practices in these three areas that will be useful for developing countries. This report reviews the major international and regional large-scale educational assessments: large-scale international surveys, school-based surveys and household-based surveys. For each of the issues discussed, there is a description of the prevailing international situation, followed by a consideration of the issue for developing countries and then a description of the relevance of the issue to PISA for Development.

  • 10-December-2015

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 58 - Who wants to become a teacher?

    Across OECD countries, 5% of students expect to work as teachers: 3% of boys and 6% of girls. The academic profile of students who expect to work as teachers varies, but in many OECD countries, students who expect to work as teachers have poorer mathematics and reading skills than other ambitious students who expect to work as professionals but not as teachers.

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  • 10-December-2015

    English

    What students don’t want to be when they grow up (OECD Education&Skills Today Blog)

    Who wants to be a teacher? As this month’s PISA in Focus shows, in many countries the teaching profession is having a hard time making itself an attractive career choice – particularly among boys and among the highest-performing students.

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  • 4-December-2015

    English, PDF, 297kb

    Students, Computers and Learning: Making the Connection - Colombia

    Despite rapidly expanding access to ICT among households, in 2012 some 37% of 15-year-old students in Colombia still had no access to a computer at home (in 2009, this proportion was 52%).

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  • 4-December-2015

    English, PDF, 3,559kb

    Schools for Skills - A New Learning Agenda for Egypt

    Egypt is going through a major political transition. It will need to manage that transition in ways that bring about greater cohesion in the Egyptian society and greater capacity to build a more competitive and sustainable economy. Effective education is the key to both these challenges.

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  • 1-December-2015

    English

    Opening up to Open Educational Resources (OECD Education&Skills Today Blog)

    Technology has indeed entered the classroom; but it has not yet changed the ways we teach and learn to the same extent that it has transformed our way of communicating in the outside world.

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