Latest Documents


  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 514kb

    Grade repetition: a comparative study of academic and non-academic consequences

    This article explores country-by-country differences in academic performance and attitudes towards school between students who repeated a grade in primary school, in secondary school or never repeated a grade. The analyses use PISA 2009 for 30 countries in which a relatively high proportion of students repeated a grade before the age of 15.

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  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 418kb

    Using a quasi-natural experiment to identify the effects of birth-related leave policies on subjective well-being in Europe

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the welfare effects of birth-related leave (BRL) in terms of life satisfaction. To do so, we exploit variations in BRL policies to assess their impact on life satisfaction.

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  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 334kb

    Towards global carbon pricing: direct and indirect linking of carbon markets

    Emissions trading systems (ETS) can play a major role in a cost-effective climate policy framework. Both direct linking of ETSs and indirect linking through a common crediting mechanism can reduce costs of action. We use a global recursive-dynamic computable general equilibrium model to assess the effects of direct and indirect linking of ETS systems across world regions.

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  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 510kb

    Demographic or labour market trends: what determines the distribution of household earnings in OECD countries?

    This article assesses various underlying driving factors for the evolution of household earnings inequality for 23 OECD countries from the mid-1980s to the mid-2000s.

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  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 283kb

    Technological effects of intra-OECD trade in manufacturing: a panel data analysis over the period 1988-2008

    This article seeks to study how intra-OECD trade in manufacturing goods has affected technological heterogeneity across member states during 1988-2008. To this aim, we derive a panel data version of the Eaton and Kortum (2002) normalised trade model to estimate, annually, the technological heterogeneity of OECD countries.

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  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 527kb

    Policy incentives for private innovation and maximising the returns

    This paper uses panel regression techniques to assess the policy determinants of private-sector innovative activity – proxied by R&D expenditure and the number of new patents – across 19 OECD countries. The relationship between innovation indicators and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth is also examined with a particular focus on the role of public policies in influencing the returns to new knowledge.

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  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 511kb

    Choosing the pace of fiscal consolidation

    In many OECD countries debt has soared to levels threatening fiscal sustainability, necessitating its reduction over the medium to longer term. This paper proposes a stylised model, featuring endogenous interactions between fiscal policy, growth and financial markets, to highlight how economic shocks and structural features of an economy can affect consolidation strategy and resulting growth and inflation developments.

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  • 9-March-2015

    English, PDF, 708kb

    Reconciling fiscal consolidation with growth and equity

    Despite sustained efforts made in recent years to rein in budget deficits, a majority of OECD countries still face substantial public finance consolidation needs. While essential to avoid the disruption and large costs ultimately associated with unsustainable public finances, fiscal consolidation complicates the task of achieving other policy goals. In most cases, it weighs on demand in the short term.

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  • 6-mars-2015

    Français

    Stimuler la productivité en Russie: les compétences, l'éducation et l'innovation

    Le marché du travail en Russie est très flexible. Il en résulte un taux d'emploi global élevé et stable, mais également un niveau élevé des inégalités salariales, de l’emploi informel et du taux de rotation de la main d’oeuvre, ce qui limite les incitations pour les entreprises à investir dans le capital humain et l'amélioration de la productivité.

  • 6-mars-2015

    Français

    Stimuler la croissance et réduire l’informalité au Mexique

    Le Mexique est engagé dans un ensemble audacieux de réformes structurelles qui lui permettront de rompre avec trois décennies de croissance lente et une faible productivité.

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