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  • 8-March-2019

    English

    SIGI 2019 Global Report - Transforming Challenges into Opportunities

    Over the past decade, the Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI) has consistently shown that governments need to look at discriminatory laws, social norms and practices to achieve gender equality and promote women’s empowerment. This 2019 global report provides an overview of the main outcomes of the SIGI in relation to women and the family, their physical integrity, access to productive and financial resources and their civic rights. Building on these outcomes, this report provides a set of policy recommendations to enhance governments’ efforts to deliver their gender-equality commitments through a three-pronged approach: starting with legal reforms and transformative gender policies, enforcing laws through community mobilisation and empowerment, and learning about the efficiency of policy through monitoring.
  • 7-March-2019

    English

    Emerging Markets Forum: The Increasing Convergence of Issues Impacting the Future of both Emerging and Advanced Economies

    At that time, many emerging market economies were experiencing full-blown crises while most advanced economies were doing relatively well. Ten years later, almost all OECD countries went into recession together, with many facing financial crises as well, while China and India barely missed a step in their rapid growth.

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  • 6-March-2019

    English

    2019 Meeting of the Members of the Council on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

    This is a special year for the 2030 Agenda. In September, for the first time since the adoption of the SDGs, leaders will gather in New York for a comprehensive stock-taking exercise of global progress achieved this far. This will be a crucial exercise in helping us to reinvigorate our efforts, identify shortfalls and correct our course for the SDGs where we are not on track.

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  • 4-mars-2019

    Français

    Coopération pour le développement 2018 - Agir ensemble pour n'oublier personne

    Lorsque les États membres des Nations Unies ont approuvé l’Agenda 2030 pour le développement durable en 2015, ils ont convenu que les objectifs et les cibles du développement durable devaient être atteints pour toutes les nations et tous les groupes de la société. Les gouvernements et les autres parties prenantes de l’agenda 2030 assument ainsi l'ambition de ne laisser personne de côté. Cette ambition apparaît de plus en plus souvent dans les politiques de développement, les priorités de la communauté internationale et les actions de plaidoyer de la société civile. Comment garantir, dans les faits, que personne ne soit laissé de côté ? Les décideurs politiques, la société civile et les entreprises demandent plus de clarté. Concrètement, qu’est-ce que cela implique pour la conception et la mise en œuvre des politiques économiques, sociales et environnementales ? Comment adapter les politiques de coopération au développement, la programmation et les mécanismes de responsabilisation ? Qu'est-ce que les gouvernements, les partenaires au développement et la communauté internationale devraient faire différemment pour que la poursuite des objectifs de développement durable améliore la vie de tous, et en premier lieu celle des plus défavorisés ? Le Rapport Coopération pour le développement 2018 : Agir ensemble pour n’oublier personne répond à ces questions et à bien d'autres. Il s’appuie sur les données les plus récentes pour montrer ce qu‘être « laissé de côté » veut dire. Tout en adoptant un large éventail de perspectives, l’ouvrage tire les leçons des politiques publiques, des pratiques et des partenariats qui fonctionnent le mieux. Il propose un cadre d’action holistique et innovant pour garantir que les politiques et les outils de coopération au développement soient à la hauteur de l’enjeu : n’oublier personne.
  • 28-February-2019

    English

    Guatemala becomes the 54th member of the OECD Development Centre

    Guatemala’s entry into the OECD Development Centre marks a significant stride in support of the country’s development agenda. It also strengthens the Centre’s global representativeness and institutional cooperation with Central America and the Latin America and the Caribbean region more broadly.

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  • 22-February-2019

    English

    Geographical Distribution of Financial Flows to Developing Countries 2019 - Disbursements, Commitments, Country Indicators

    This publication provides comprehensive data on the volume, origin and types of aid and other resource flows to around 150 developing countries. The data show each country's receipts of official development assistance as well as other official and private funds from members of the Development Assistance Committee of the OECD, multilateral agencies and other key providers. Key development indicators are given for reference.
  • 21-February-2019

    English

    Launch of the Development Co-operation Report 2018: Joining Forces to Leave No One Behind

    Today, we stand exactly 10 years, 10 months and 10 days away from the deadline for achieving SDG number 1: the complete eradication of extreme poverty. This means that we have 566 weeks left to lift just under 10% of the world’s population –around 700 million people – out of extreme poverty. We need to accelerate.

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  • 20-février-2019

    Français

  • 14-February-2019

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Thailand (Volume 2) - In-depth Analysis and Recommendations

    Thailand is a fast emerging country that aspires to become a high-income economy by 2037. Still, Thailand’s growth path has created large disparities that risk obstructing the next stage of development. This report lays out three transitions that Thailand needs to master to build capabilities and sustain faster but also more inclusive economic growth. First, the country should move from a growth path dominated by few and geographically concentrated sources of innovation to one that focuses on unlocking the full potential of all regions. Second, to support a new growth agenda, it should organise multi-level governance and the relationship between the many layers of government more effectively, particularly with regards to financial resources. Last but not least, Thailand should focus on water and environment, moving from a resource-intensive growth path with costly natural disasters to one characterised by sustainable development. In the case of water, this means moving from ad-hoc responses to effective management of water security.
  • 14-February-2019

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Slovak Republic 2019

    The OECD's Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts periodic reviews of the individual development co-operation efforts of DAC members. The policies and programmes of each DAC member are critically examined approximately once every five years. DAC peer reviews assess the performance of a given member, not just that of its development co-operation agency, and examine both policy and implementation. They take an integrated, system-wide perspective on the development co-operation and humanitarian assistance activities of the member under review.This peer review of the Slovak Republic, the first since it joined the DAC in 2013, shows how the country successfully raised its voice and influence in global fora, and documents its efforts to align with the 2030 Agenda. The report recommends that the Slovak Republic continue to build its policy framework, sharpen its focus, and embed the management systems needed for an effective development co-operation programme.
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