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  • 7-December-2016

    English, PDF, 1,186kb

    Aid for trade and the sustainable development aganda: strengthening synergies

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with the Sustainable Development Goals at its core calls to “(…) increase aid-for-trade support for developing countries, in particular least developed countries.” In response, the OECD Action Plan on the Sustainable Development Goals: Better Policies for 2030 also argues for further promoting aid for trade and ensuring that it supports the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

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  • 1-December-2016

    English

    Second High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation - closing remarks

    While the SDG Summit was the “what” conference, the last two days have been the “how” conference. By 2030, we need to end extreme poverty. We need to have made a dent on all poverty. And we should be well on the way to eradicating it altogether.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Using aid for structural change in fragile states could help curb rising instability

    The world has grown more violent over the last decade, interrupting a long-term trend of increasing peace and disproportionately impacting civilians. This is despite rising financial flows to the most vulnerable places, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Moving forward: How effective development can deliver the 2030 Agenda - remarks at Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation 2nd high-level meeting

    As I mentioned at the opening of our conference, we need to go from billions to trillions when it comes to development finance. The Global Partnership provides a strong platform for bringing together the wide range of actors to make that happen.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Second High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation - opening remarks

    The urgency of sustainable development is evident in all countries. Shifts in wealth, power and growth challenge traditional development models. At the same time, we see new players, new ideas and new sources of finance. Developing countries are increasingly using taxes and remittances to finance their own development. In Africa alone in absolute numbers, tax revenues dwarf official development assistance by more than ten times.

  • 29-novembre-2016

    Français

    Les recettes fiscales continuent d’augmenter, cependant le potentiel pour une mobilisation fiscale accrue subsiste dans les économies émergentes d’Asie du Sud-Est

    En 2014, les ratios impôts/PIB de l’Indonésie, de la Malaisie, des Philippines et de Singapour étaient inférieurs à 17% du PIB alors que la Corée et le Japon, ont tous deux affiché des ratios impôts/PIB supérieurs à 24%, selon de nouvelles données publiées dans la troisième édition de la publication annuelle de l'OCDE Revenue Statistics in Asian Countries.

    Documents connexes
  • 29-November-2016

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Asian Countries 2016 - Trends in Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore

    This publication compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database – a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to Asian countries enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among Asian economies and between OECD and Asian economies. This work has been is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and the OECD Development Centre.

  • 17-November-2016

    English

    Donor support to southern women’s rights organisations: OECD findings

    The case for investing in women’s rights organisations is firmly established. This report seeks to shed light on how this can best be done. It reviews how DAC donors are partnering with southern women’s rights organisations and identifies promising approaches, models and mechanisms.

  • 15-November-2016

    English

    Improving Economic Instruments for Water Resources Management in the Republic of Buryatia (Lake Baikal Basin)

    A major challenge facing the Republic of Buryatia, subject of the Russian Federation, is how to balance the task of protecting Lake Baikal – a unique water object and ecological system included in the UNESCO list of World Natural Heritage Areas – with the need for dynamic and sustainable socio-economic development of the republic.  This requires streamlining and improving water policy jointly with economic, administrative, information and other policy instruments. The recommendations in this report aim to help achieve this objective. They include the introduction of abstraction charges for irrigation water as a  natural resource; enhancement of state support to the water sector; and improvement of economic instruments for managing risks of water-related hazards (such as compulsory insurance and differentiated land tax rates in flood prone areas). A few innovative instruments are also recommended for pilot testing such as establishing limits for discharges of certain hazardous substances in a pilot area (e.g. Selenga river basin) and progressive development of market for tradable quotas for discharges of the “capped” pollutants; and introducing a charge (tax) on toxic agricultural chemicals (pesticides, herbicides, etc.) and synthetic detergents so that to create incentives for the reduction of diffuse water pollution.

  • 14-November-2016

    English

    Private Sector Engagement for Sustainable Development - Lessons from the DAC

    Members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) are increasingly working with the private sector in development co-operation to realise sustainable development outcomes. To learn from this experience, the DAC introduced a peer learning review on working with and through the private sector in development co-operation. Private Sector Engagement for Sustainable Development: Lessons from the DAC examines the politics, policies and institutions behind private sector engagement, the focus and delivery of private sector engagements, private sector engagement portfolios, effective partnership and thematic issues including risk, leverage and ensuring results. Drawing on the practical experiences of DAC members, the report highlights good practice, provides a typology of private sector engagement and outlines key lessons. It highlights the importance of aligning private sector engagements to overall development co-operation strategies and aid effectiveness principles. It also looks at investing in institutional capacities, developing a suite of flexible mechanisms for private sector engagement, and adopting appropriate systems to monitor, evaluate and report on the results of partnerships with the private sector.

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