Publications & Documents


  • 14-November-2017

    English

    OECD Guidelines on Measuring Trust

    Trust, both interpersonal trust, and trust in institutions, is a key ingredient of growth, societal well-being and governance. As a first step to improving existing measures of trust, the OECD Guidelines on Measuring Trust provide international recommendations on collecting, publishing, and analysing trust data to encourage their use by National Statistical Offices (NSOs). The Guidelines also outline why measures of trust are relevant for monitoring and policy making, and why NSOs have a critical role in enhancing the usefulness of existing trust measures. Besides looking at the statistical quality of trust measures, best approaches for measuring trust in a reliable and consistent way and guidance for reporting, interpretation and analysis are provided. A number of prototype survey modules that national and international agencies can use in their household surveys are included.

    These Guidelines have been produced as part of the OECD Better Life Initiative, a pioneering project launched in 2011, with the objective to measure society’s progress across eleven domains of well-being. They complement a series of similar measurement guidelines on subjective well-being, micro statistics on household wealth, integrated analysis of the distribution on household income, consumption and wealth, as well as the quality of the working environment.

  • 7-November-2017

    English

    Fifth OECD Forum on Tax and Crime

    Financial crime is one of the greatest threats to the economic and social well‑being of people living in all countries. Illicit financial activities such as tax evasion, corruption, terrorist financing, computer fraud, money laundering and other financial crimes are a global problem demanding a global response.

    Related Documents
  • 30-September-2017

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - Illicit Trade and Development Challenges in West Africa

    This report shows how criminal economies and illicit financial flows through and within West Africa affect people’s lives. It goes beyond the traditional analysis of illicit financial flows, which focuses on the value of monetary flows. The report exposes the ways in which criminal and illicit activities and resulting illicit financial flows damage governance, the economy, development and security. It presents case studies based on concrete examples from West Africa of human trafficking, drug smuggling, counterfeit goods, gold mining and terrorism financing. It identifies networks and drivers – in the region or elsewhere – that allow these criminal economies to thrive, by feeding and facilitating these activities and the circulation of illicitly-obtained revenue. It also examines the impacts on local communities, such as changes in wealth distribution, power dynamics and the degree to which illicit money undermines social organisation.

    This book proposes a policy framework for both source and destination countries of illicit flows that looks beyond the concerns of developed countries to enhance development prospects at the local level and respond to the needs of the most vulnerable stakeholders. Combating criminal economies and preventing illicit financial flows will require sustained partnerships between producing and consuming countries. West Africa cannot be expected to address these challenges alone.

  • 18-August-2017

    English

    OECD Integrity Review of Colombia - Investing in Integrity for Peace and Prosperity

    Integrity is crucial in order to ensure sustainable peace in Colombia. This report provides a focused analysis of Colombia’s integrity system, addressing existing gaps and elaborating policy recommendations on how to build a coherent public integrity system. The review pays special attention to improving co-ordination at the national level and with the regions, cultivating a culture of integrity in the public administration, and enabling effective accountability through internal control and risk management. It emphasises the priority of mainstreaming integrity policies in the processes and sectors related to the implementation of the Peace Agreement to prevent corruption and to contribute to the inclusive and sustainable development of the country.

  • 30-juin-2017

    Français

    Cadre d'intégrité pour l'investissement public

    L’investissement public et en particulier celui dans l’infrastructure, est important pour une croissance et un développement économique durables ainsi que pour la prestation des services publics. Cependant, il est vulnérable au risque de corruption et de capture. Ce rapport examine les bénéfices directs et indirects de l’investissement public si réalisé de manière éthique et efficace. Il fournit un Cadre d’intégrité pour l’investissement public, répertoriant les risques de corruption à chaque étape du cycle de l’investissement. Il identifie également les outils et mécanismes de promotion de l’intégrité dans le cycle de l’investissement et fournit des exemples de leur mise en place réussie à la fois dans les secteurs privé et public.

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 30-juin-2017

    Français

    Le financement de la démocratie - Financement des partis politiques et des campagnes électorales et risque de capture de l'action publique

    Le récent débat sur le rôle de l’argent en politique a mis en lumière les défis liés à la règlementation du financement politique. Quels sont les risques associés au financement des partis politiques et des campagnes électorales ? Pourquoi les modèles de réglementation actuels restent-ils insuffisants pour combattre ces risques ? Quels liens y a-t-il entre l’argent en politique et les cadres généraux d’intégrité dans le secteur public ? Ce rapport traite de ces trois questions et définit un Cadre de financement de la démocratie ayant pour objet de structurer le débat international, de proposer des solutions aux responsables publics et de dresser une cartographie des risques. Il contient également des études de cas consacrées au Canada, au Chili, à la Corée, à l’Estonie, à la France, au Mexique, au Royaume-Uni, ainsi qu’au Brésil et à l’Inde. Y sont analysés en détail les mécanismes de financement politique de ces pays et les défis qu'ils rencontrent dans différents cadres institutionnels.

  • 29-June-2017

    English

    2017 Global Forum on Responsible Business Conduct

    29-30 June 2017, Paris: The Global Forum is the first multi-stakeholder platform for integrating corporate responsibility questions into the global economic agenda. Governments, business, trade unions and civil society will come together to provide insights and exchange views on how to do well while doing no harm in an effort to contribute to sustainable development and enduring social progress.

    Related Documents
  • 27-juin-2017

    Français

    Méthodologie d'évaluation de la mise en œuvre des Principes de gouvernance d'entreprise du G20 et de l'OCDE

    Les Principes de gouvernance d’entreprise du G20 et de l’OCDE aident les responsables publics à évaluer et à améliorer le cadre juridique, réglementaire et institutionnel de gouvernance des entreprises, en vue de promouvoir l’efficience économique, la croissance durable et la stabilité financière. Ils constituent l’une des normes essentielles pour la solidité des systèmes financiers adoptées par le Forum de stabilité financière.

    La Méthodologie d’évaluation de la mise en œuvre des Principes de gouvernance d’entreprise du G20 et de l’OCDE a été élaborée par le Comité sur la gouvernance d’entreprise de l’OCDE, avec la participation de la Banque mondiale, dans le but d’étayer l’évaluation de la mise en œuvre des Principes dans une juridiction et de fournir un cadre pour des discussions sur l’action à mener, par exemple dans le contexte des Rapports sur l’observation des normes et codes (RONC) ou d’autres évaluations de pays. Cette dernière version intègre les modifications apportées aux Principes au cours de leur révision de 2015, ainsi qu’un certain nombre de précisions supplémentaires.
     

  • 23-June-2017

    English

    Mapping the Real Routes of Trade in Fake Goods

    Trade in counterfeit and pirated goods is a vital threat for modern, innovation-driven economies, a worldwide phenomenon that grows in scope and magnitude. Counterfeiters ship infringing products via complex routes, with many intermediary points, which poses a substantial challenge to efficient enforcement. This study looks at the issue of the complex routes of trade in counterfeit pirated goods. Using a set of statistical filters, it identifies key producing economies and key transit points. The analysis is done for ten main sectors for which counterfeiting is the key threat. The results will facilitate tailoring policy responses to strengthen governance frameworks to tackle this risk, depending on the profile of a given economy that is known as a source of counterfeit goods in international trade.
     

  • 22-June-2017

    English

    Lithuania - OECD Anti-Bribery Convention

    This page contains all information relating to implementation of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention in Lithuania.

    Related Documents
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 > >>