Reports


  • 6-December-2010

    Chinese, , 1,545kb

  • 17-November-2010

    English

    The Economic Impact of Export Restrictions on Raw Materials

    Export restrictions on raw materials are applied to achieve a number of policy objectives. However, they can have a significant and negative impact on the efficient allocation of resources, international trade, and the competitiveness and development of industries in both exporting and importing countries.  

    By diverting exports to domestic markets, export restrictions raise prices for foreign consumers and importers. At the same time, by reducing domestic prices in the applying countries and increasing global uncertainty concerning future prices, export restrictions negatively affect investment, thus potentially reducing the overall supply of raw materials in the long term. In view of existing alternative policy tools that have a different impact on trade, the effectiveness of export restrictions to achieve stated policy objectives should be carefully reviewed.  

    This publication presents a selection of papers discussed at the OECD Workshop on Raw Materials, held in Paris in October 2009. This workshop was organised in response to the growing concern on the use of export restrictions on raw materials, particularly by emerging economies.

  • 15-November-2010

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Guangdong, China 2010

    Located on the southern coast of China, Guangdong is the country’s most populous and rich province. It has 95.4 million inhabitants and provides one-eighth of the national GDP. A key development feature of Guangdong has been “processing trade”, which has allowed companies to profit from importing materials, assembling goods and exporting them via Hong Kong, China.

    The recent economic crisis has had a strong impact on the province, although Guangdong also faces in-depth structural problems. Growing labour costs and strain on land availability have increasingly challenged the province’s traditional model of development, as have new competitors in China and abroad. Meanwhile, regional disparities within the province have increased, with a high concentration of economic activities and foreign direct investment in the Pearl River Delta area, an agglomeration of nine prefectures of 47.7 million inhabitants that represents 79.4% of the province’s total GDP.

    This review assesses Guangdong’s current approach to economic development. The province is focusing on industrial policies primarily aimed at heavy manufacturing industries (e.g. automobile, shipbuilding, petrochemicals) and supported by investment in hard infrastructure transport projects and energy supply, along with the implementation of the “Double Relocation” policies intended to move lower value-added factories to lagging regions through incentive mechanisms like industrial parks.

    The review discusses how some principles of the OECD regional paradigm could help Guangdong. It also addresses the huge environmental challenges that the province is facing and explores the opportunity for developing a green growth strategy. Strategies to improve Guangdong’s governance are analysed as well, with particular attention paid to co-ordination issues within the Pearl River Delta.

    The Territorial Review of Guangdong is integrated into a series of thematic reviews on regions undertaken by the OECD Territorial Development Policy Committee. The overall aim of these case studies is to draw and disseminate horizontal policy recommendations for regional and national governments.

     

     

  • 3-November-2010

    English

    Medium-term Projection Framework for Growth and Development in Southeast Asia

    The results of medium-term projections in the Southeast Asian Economic Outlook are produced based on the OECD Development Centre Medium-term Projection Framework of the SAEO 2010 (MPF: SAEO 2010).

    Related Documents
  • 6-August-2010

    English

    Growth and Sustainability in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia and South Africa

    Growth and Sustainability in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia and South Africa is based on the proceedings of a conference, organised by the OECD, on the growth performance of these large emerging-market economies.

    Related Documents
  • 1-June-2010

    English, , 544kb

    Learning for Jobs, OECD Reviews of Vocational Education and Training: Options for China

    Many strengths are apparent in the Chinese system for vocational education and training in upper secondary schools. The strengths include: The establishment of 9 year schooling with almost all children in China now completing lower secondary education.

    Related Documents
  • 27-May-2010

    Chinese, , 2,639kb

    Eco-Innovation Policies in The People’s Republic of China (Chinese version)

    Chinese version of the eco-innovation policies in China report.

    Related Documents
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 23-March-2010

    English

    Reducing Barriers to International Trade in Non-hazardous Recyclable Materials, Part 2: Case Studies

    Country case studies of China, Japan, Netherlands, South Africa and the United States in measures that may hamper trade in steel scrap, recovered paper and plastic scrap, and if and how they could be removed without compromising environmental protection.

  • 17-December-2009

    English, , 522kb

    Eco-Innovation Policies in The People’s Republic of China

    This report provides an inventory of eco-innovation policies in China. Similar reports are available on selected non-EU OECD members. They complement national roadmaps developed by EU member states under ETAP.

    Related Documents
  • 1-December-2009

    English

    Employment and Skills Strategies in Southeast Asia (ESSSA)

    The rapidly developing Southeast Asia region is confronted with significant labour market challenges. This initiative aims to address the issues of employment and skills, especially through an interaction platform for members.

  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>