Echanges


  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Remarks at China Development Forum: Launch of the Latin American Economic Outlook 2016

    This year’s Outlook focuses specifically on China and Latin America as development partners in transition. Despite their geographic distance, China and Latin America are closely connected through trade and financial ties. China is now the region’s second largest import source and third largest export destination, and the largest trading partner of Brazil, Chile and Peru.

  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Remarks at China Development Forum: Linking global value chains - A new trade regime

    I look forward to discussing with you how China can harness the potential of GVCs to boost global trade and deliver more sustainable, inclusive, and greener growth.

  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Remarks at China Development Forum: Envisioning the 2016 G20 Summit in China

    The OECD is proud to be working closely with China’s G20 Presidency towards an innovative, invigorated, interconnected and inclusive global economy. We will continue to share our multidisciplinary expertise, knowledge, tools and data to boost growth, increase investment, encourage innovation, lift employment and promote inclusiveness in the lead up to the Leaders’ Summit in Hangzhou.

  • 7-May-2014

    Chinese, PDF, 499kb

    Services Trade Restrictiveness Index Country Note: China (ZH)

    A two-page OECD summary and analysis of the Services Trade Restrictiveness Index results for China in Mandarin Chinese.

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  • 8-April-2014

    English, PDF, 243kb

    China - OECD Trade Facilitation Indicators

    Analysis for China from OECD trade facilitation indicators that identify areas where countries can improve border procedures, reduce trade costs, boost trade flows and reap greater benefits from international trade.

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  • 8-July-2013

    English

    OECD and Chinese Ministry of Commerce to host seminar on trade facilitation in Beijing on 12 July 2013

    OECD research shows that multilateral agreement to cut red tape in international trade would dramatically reduce trading costs and add a substantial boost to the global economy.

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  • 19-September-2012

    English

    Beijing: Better data for better analysis and better policies

    Production processes have become global and markets more integrated as trade costs have fallen on the back of technological progress and trade and investment policy reforms. We can no longer base policy decisions on conventional trade statistics that report the gross value of products and services each time they cross borders. Instead, we need to measure how much and where value is added, said OECD Secretary-General in Beijing.

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  • 17-September-2012

    English

    Visit of the OECD Secretary-General to China (Beijing 19th - 20th September 2012)

    During his visit China, Angel Gurría attended the Global Value Chains in the 21st Century conference, organised jointly by the OECD, UNCTAD, and the WTO in partnership with China's Ministry of Commerce. The Secretary-General also met with several high level representatives of the Chinese government and business.

  • 12-October-2011

    English

    To What Extent Do Exchange Rates and their Volatility Affect Trade?

    Exchange rate levels affect trade flows in agriculture and in the manufacturing and mining sector in China, the Euro area and the United States, though they do not explain in their entirety the trade imbalances in these three economies, this paper finds.

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  • 17-November-2010

    English

    The Economic Impact of Export Restrictions on Raw Materials

    Export restrictions on raw materials are applied to achieve a number of policy objectives. However, they can have a significant and negative impact on the efficient allocation of resources, international trade, and the competitiveness and development of industries in both exporting and importing countries.  

    By diverting exports to domestic markets, export restrictions raise prices for foreign consumers and importers. At the same time, by reducing domestic prices in the applying countries and increasing global uncertainty concerning future prices, export restrictions negatively affect investment, thus potentially reducing the overall supply of raw materials in the long term. In view of existing alternative policy tools that have a different impact on trade, the effectiveness of export restrictions to achieve stated policy objectives should be carefully reviewed.  

    This publication presents a selection of papers discussed at the OECD Workshop on Raw Materials, held in Paris in October 2009. This workshop was organised in response to the growing concern on the use of export restrictions on raw materials, particularly by emerging economies.

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