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  • 19-March-2016

    English, PDF, 4,258kb

    Active with China

    This brochure provides just a glimpse of the scope, depth and richness of our joint work with China. In 2016, our co-operation is intensifying as the OECD works closely with China in support of its G20 presidency, to build together an “Innovative, Invigorated, Interconnected and Inclusive World Economy”.

    Related Documents
  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Remarks at China Development Forum: Launch of the Latin American Economic Outlook 2016

    This year’s Outlook focuses specifically on China and Latin America as development partners in transition. Despite their geographic distance, China and Latin America are closely connected through trade and financial ties. China is now the region’s second largest import source and third largest export destination, and the largest trading partner of Brazil, Chile and Peru.

  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Remarks at China Development Forum: Linking global value chains - A new trade regime

    I look forward to discussing with you how China can harness the potential of GVCs to boost global trade and deliver more sustainable, inclusive, and greener growth.

  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Remarks at China Development Forum: Launch of the OECD-DRC project for a greener future for China’s industrial sector

    The OECD will draw on its multidisciplinary expertise, data, and tools – along with our ground-breaking work on climate finance, fossil fuel subsidy reform, measuring effective carbon prices, and policy alignment for a low-carbon economy – to deliver timely and evidence-based insights for this project, which has four main objectives.

  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Remarks at China Development Forum: Envisioning the 2016 G20 Summit in China

    The OECD is proud to be working closely with China’s G20 Presidency towards an innovative, invigorated, interconnected and inclusive global economy. We will continue to share our multidisciplinary expertise, knowledge, tools and data to boost growth, increase investment, encourage innovation, lift employment and promote inclusiveness in the lead up to the Leaders’ Summit in Hangzhou.

  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Policies for Sound and Effective Investment in China

    Since the start of the economic reform process in the 70s China has been able to generate a large volume of investment, both from domestic and foreign sources. This high volume of investment was instrumental in sustaining strong economic growth and related improvements in living standards. However, this growth model is not longer sustainable. Returns on investment have fallen, excessive capacity is plaguing several sectors and the negative externalities have been very onerous, notably in terms of environmental degradation and rising income inequality. A key objective of the Chinese government is therefore to move the economy towards a more balanced, sustainable and inclusive growth path as envisaged by the 13th Five-Year Plan. In this adjustment process, the country is seeking new approaches for smarter, greener and more productive investment. This will require mutually reinforcing reforms to improve investment planning, rebalance the role of government and market forces, mainstream responsible business conduct and encourage greater private investment, especially in green infrastructure. China’s growing role as an outward investor may act as catalyser for the required reforms at home, as Chinese private and state-owned enterprises have to adopt internationally recognised practices and standards .

  • 27-February-2016

    English

  • 4-February-2016

    English

    Broadening the Ownership of State-Owned Enterprises - A Comparison of Governance Practices

    The State continues to remain an important shareholder in listed companies worldwide, especially among emerging economies, which rely increasingly on mixed-ownership models. With the benefit of hindsight and more recent examples, this book provides fresh perspectives on the motivation to list state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and the process it entails. Drawing from the experiences of five economies (People's Republic of China, India, New Zealand, Poland and Turkey), the book concludes that broadened ownership generally has a positive impact on the governance and performance of these companies. However, country practices show that the act of listing cannot guarantee that these companies are completely averse to State interests; and deviations from sound corporate governance practices, as enshrined in the OECD Guidelines on Corporate Governance of SOEs, can in some cases, raise concerns with regards to non-State shareholder rights, commercial orientation, board independence, conflicting State objectives, transparency, disclosure and more.

  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Energy Investments and Technology Transfer Across Emerging Economies: The Case of Brazil and China

    Growing innovation capacity among emerging markets and increasing investment flows between them are creating new, reciprocal opportunities through the deployment of technological innovations and knowledge transfer. The case of Brazil and China is particularly relevant in this context. Between 2005 and 2012, the Brazilian energy sector absorbed USD 18.3 billion worth of investments from China. Sino-Brazilian trade and political relations have intensified over the past decade.

    This report focuses on three main questions: What are the drivers behind Chinese investment in the Brazilian energy sector? What potential exists for inter-firm technology transfer between the Chinese and Brazilian companies involved? Do government-sponsored activities and academic exchanges complement inter-firm technology transfer? The analysis highlights the potential of energy technology co-operation between Brazil and China, the deployment of innovations in third countries and, more generally, the intensification of global co-operation in

  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Update on Overseas Investments by China's National Oil Companies - Achievements and Challenges since 2011

    Chinese NOCs first ventured overseas to invest in oil and gas production more than 20 years ago. Today, they have emerged to become international players with activities spreading across more than 40 countries and producing 2.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day (mboe/d) of oil and gas outside of China. Chinese companies have contributed much-needed investments in global oil and gas production.

    This report provides an update on overseas activity by China’s National Oil Companies (NOCs) between 2011 and 2013 and is a follow-up publication of IEA’s previous report in 2011, Overseas Investments by Chinese National Oil Companies: Assessing the Drivers and Impacts. It aims to examine the trends exhibited by investments made by Chinese NOCs and the risks and challenges they face today and raised the question if China’s long standing non-interference foreign policy could still be valid given China’s worldwide commercial interests, including those of the NOCs’.

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