Reports


  • 15-June-2016

    English

    The risks in Canada’s unusual housing market(s)

    Local housing markets are presently highly disparate in Canada. While in most smaller localities real estate prices are fairly stable and not out of line with the fundamentals (incomes and rents), 10 of the 15 large Census Metropolitan Areas monitored by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) show signs of overvaluation, and seven show moderate or strong evidence of overbuilding.

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  • 14-juin-2016

    Français

    Montréal : Métropole de talent - Pistes d'action pour améliorer l'emploi, l'innovation et les compétences

    Le rapport « Montréal Métropole de Talent » propose des pistes d’action pour améliorer l’emploi, l’innovation et les compétences, afin que Montréal joue véritablement son rôle de moteur du développement économique et social au Québec et au-delà.

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  • 13-juin-2016

    Français

    Étude économique du Canada 2016

    L’économie canadienne s’ajuste à la baisse des termes de l’échange. Réduire les risques à la stabilité financière, accroître les gains de productivité et rendre la croissance plus verte et inclusive sont les principaux défis.

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  • 13-juin-2016

    Français, PDF, 3,466kb

    Promouvoir une croissance verte et inclusive au Canada

    Le présent rapport a été conçu pour aider le gouvernement du Canada à mettre en oeuvre son ambitieux programme de réforme. Il suggère au Canada des moyens de relever la productivité par des ajustements de son cadre réglementaire, de ses infrastructures et de ses politiques en matière de concurrence et d’innovation.

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  • 31-May-2016

    English, PDF, 1,180kb

    How's life in Canada?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2016.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Taxing Wages: Canada

    The tax burden on labour income is expressed by the tax wedge, which is a measure of the net tax burden on labour income borne by the employee and the employer.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English, PDF, 437kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Canada

    Canada has the 10th lowest tax wedge among the 34 OECD member countries in 2015. The country occupied the same position in 2014. The average single worker in Canada faced a tax wedge of 31.6% in 2015 compared with the OECD average of 35.9%.

  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 432kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in Canada

    To become a doctor in Canada, a student can therefore expect 9 to 13 years of university education and post-graduate training, depending on the area of specialisation.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 315kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Canada

    In Canada, there are three main categories for nurses: Licenced Practice Nurses (LPNs), Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPNs). In addition, registered nurses can pursue further education to become Clinical Nurse Specialists and/or Nurse Practitioners.

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  • 7-March-2016

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Canada 2015

    Canada has continued to harvest its vast natural resources and witnessed a shale revolution alongside rising oil sands production and investment in the energy sector over the past five years. The medium-term outlook for gas/oil production and exports, however, is challenging amid uncertainties around pipeline developments and an era of low prices, abundant global supplies and surging production in the United States, Canada’s main export market.

    Canada maintains the highest energy supply per capita among IEA member countries. Emissions from the oil and gas sectors increased by 14% in 2005-13, despite Canada’s low-carbon electricity mix (largely hydro and nuclear). The federal government, with the provinces, has put forward stringent energy efficiency and emission standards in the buildings, power and transport sectors, but not in industry. To strengthen its position as responsible energy supplier and user, Canada must take action to mitigate emissions and energy intensity. It can continue to develop its resources in a sustainable and cost-effective manner while balancing its economic and sustainability goals.

    Canada remains at the forefront of technological and regulatory innovation in unconventional oil and gas production and carbon capture and storage (CCS) with four large-scale CCS projects under way in 2015. The country has adopted ambitious climate targets at provincial and federal levels, but the federation is far from meeting its targets for 2020 and 2030. In July 2015, the Premiers of the provinces and territories agreed a Canadian Energy Strategy. The IEA urges the federal government to seize this opportunity for collective action to meet its 2030 goals and bring certainty to investment in clean-energy technologies and renewables.

    This in-depth review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Canada and provides recommendations for each energy sector, including advice for the implementation of the Canadian Energy Strategy.

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