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Publications & Documents


  • 10-juin-2020

    Français

    Intégrer les immigrants pour stimuler l’innovation au Québec, Canada

    L’attractivité du Québec auprès des migrants repose à la fois sur les politiques d’intégration au marché du travail et sur la nature des opportunités d’emploi. Cependant, bien que les immigrés du Québec figurent parmi les plus éduqués de l’OCDE, la province reste confrontée à de nombreux défis qui les empêchent de s’intégrer au marché du travail. Parmi ces défis, on note une maîtrise imparfaite de la langue française, la non-reconnaissance des qualifications étrangères, des différences culturelles qui se reflètent dans les habitudes professionnelles et un manque d’initiatives visant la promotion de l’entrepreneuriat. Dans le cadre de cette étude une enquête auprès employeurs a été réalisée afin de comprendre leur expérience en matière de recrutement d’immigrants et de connaître leur perception de l’utilité des outils disponibles pour favoriser l’intégration et l’embauche d’immigrants. Ce rapport présente une analyse des enjeux liés à l’intégration des migrants au niveau local et propose des exemples de bonnes pratiques mises en place dans d’autres régions de l’OCDE.
  • 30-April-2020

    English, PDF, 383kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Canada

    The tax wedge for the average single worker in Canada decreased by 0.3 percentage points from 30.8 in 2018 to 30.5 in 2019. The OECD average tax wedge in 2019 was 36.0 (2018, 36.1).

  • 30-April-2020

    English

    Workforce Innovation to Foster Positive Learning Environments in Canada

    Canada has introduced a set of programmes to test novel approaches to skills development. This report analyses the potential of these programmes to improve the future-readiness of Canada’s adult learning system. Further, it outlines how these programmes might be expanded to promote optimal skills use and learning within workplaces, through the use of high-performance work practices.
  • 14-April-2020

    English

    Synthesising good practices in fiscal federalism - Key recommendations from 15 years of country surveys

    The design of intergovernmental fiscal relations can help to ensure that tax and spending powers are assigned in a way to promote sustainable and inclusive economic growth. Decentralisation can enable sub-central governments to provide better public services for households and firms, while it can also make intergovernmental frameworks more complex, harming equity. The challenges of fiscal federalism are multi-faceted and involve difficult trade-offs. This synthesis paper consolidates much of the OECD’s work on fiscal federalism over the past 15 years, with a particular focus on OECD Economic Surveys. The paper identifies a range of good practices on the design of country policies and institutions related strengthening fiscal capacity delineating responsibilities across evels of government and improving intergovernmental co-ordination.
  • 3-April-2020

    English

    Behavioural Insights and Organisations - Fostering Safety Culture

    Behavioural insights (BI) has become widely used by public bodies around the world, mostly towards improving the way policies are implemented and influencing individual behaviour. As the field of BI evolves to tackle more complex policy issues, there is widespread perception that BI can and should go beyond the study of individual-level decision processes for higher impact. This report presents research on applying BI to changing the behaviour of organisations, with a focus on fostering elements of a safety culture in the energy sector. It presents comparative findings from experiments with energy regulators in Canada, Ireland, Mexico and Oman, as well as guidance for applying BI to safety culture going forward.
  • 19-March-2020

    English

    Patterns of innovation, advanced technology use and business practices in Canadian firms

    This paper uses a distributed microdata analysis approach to map patterns of technology adoption in Canadian firms, exploring the relationship between technology adoption, business practices and innovation. Prepared by the OECD NESTI secretariat in collaboration with Statistics Canada, the paper leverages a unique enterprise database combining information on innovation, technology adoption and the use of selected business practices. This work suggests a number of possible pathways for selecting and defining priority technology and business practices for data collection and reporting, implementing recommendations in the 2018 Oslo Manual on enablers and objectives of business innovation, and identifying potential synergies between business innovation, management and ICT, and other surveys focused on various aspects of technology adoption.
  • 9-March-2020

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 9-mars-2020

    Français, PDF, 998kb

    Comment va la vie au Canada ?

    Cette note présente une série d'incidateurs publiés dans "Comment va la vie? 2020"

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  • 5-March-2020

    English

    Open, Useful and Re-usable data (OURdata) Index: 2019

    This paper presents and discusses the general findings and key policy messages of the 2019 OECD Open, Useful and Re-usable data (OURdata) Index, and provides a detailed analysis of the results for each pillar and sub-pillar. Additionally, it assesses the main advancements and challenges related to the design and implementation of open government data (OGD) policies in OECD member and partner countries by comparing the results for 2019 with those of the 2017 edition. This policy paper contributes to the OECD work on the digital transformation of the public sector, including digital government and data-driven public sector and open government data.
  • 21-January-2020

    English

    Linking Indigenous Communities with Regional Development in Canada

    Canada’s Constitution Act (1982) recognises three Indigenous groups: Indians (now referred to as First Nations), Inuit, and Métis. Indigenous peoples make a vital contribution to the culture, heritage and economic development of Canada. Despite improvements in Indigenous well-being in recent decades, significant gaps remain with the non-Indigenous population. This study focuses on four priority issues to maximise the potential of Indigenous economies in Canada. First, improving the quality of the statistical framework and the inclusion of Indigenous peoples in the governance of data. Second, measures to improve the fairness and transparency for how Indigenous peoples can secure land tenure and the use of tools and such as land use planning to use it to promote community economic development. Third, promoting entrepreneurship so Indigenous peoples can use assets and resources in ways that align with their objectives for development. Fourth, implementing an approach to governance that adapts policies to places, and empowers Indigenous institutions and communities.
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