Publications & Documents


  • 21-novembre-2014

    Français

    Panorama de l'aide pour le commerce 2013 - Se connecter aux chaînes de valeur

    Cette publication conjointe OCDE-OMC est un coup de projecteur sur l’Aide pour le commerce visant à évaluer ce qui se passe, ce qui ne se passe pas, et où des améliorations sont nécessaires. L’analyse porte plus particulièrement sur les tendances des politiques, programmes et pratiques dans le domaine de l’Aide pour le commerce. Elle montre que l’initiative Aide pour le commerce produit des résultats tangibles en améliorant les résultats commerciaux et les conditions de vie des gens, en particulier des femmes, dans les pays en développement.
    Il ressort du rapport que l’Aide pour le commerce joue un rôle important en permettant aux entreprises des pays en développement de se connecter aux chaînes de valeur et de s’élever dans ces chaînes. En fait, l’émergence des chaînes de valeur renforce la légitimité de l’Aide pour le commerce.
    Les parties prenantes continuent à participer activement à l’initiative Aide pour le commerce. L’exercice de suivi de 2013 était basé sur les auto évaluations de 80 pays en développement, 28 donateurs bilatéraux, 15 donateurs multilatéraux et 9 fournisseurs de coopération Sud Sud. À cela s’ajoutaient les avis exprimés par 524 entreprises (fournisseurs) de pays en développement et 173 entreprises dominantes, pour la plupart des pays de l’OCDE.
     

     

  • 14-novembre-2014

    Français

    Historique de la Liste des pays bénéficiaires de l’aide établie par le CAD

    Historique de la Liste établie par le CAD des bénéficiaires de l’aide (définition et anciennes listes)

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  • 11-November-2014

    English

    Towards Green Growth in Southeast Asia

    Southeast Asia’s booming economy offers tremendous growth potential, but also large and interlinked economic, social and environmental challenges. The region’s current growth model is based in large part on natural resource exploitation, exacerbating these challenges. This report provides evidence that, with the right policies and institutions, Southeast Asia can pursue green growth and thus sustain the natural capital and environmental services, including a stable climate, on which prosperity depends.

    Carried out in consultation with officials and researchers from across the region, Towards Green Growth in Southeast Asia provides a framework for regional leaders to design their own solutions to move their countries towards green growth. While recognising the pressures that Southeast Asian economies face to increase growth, fight poverty and enhance well-being, the report acknowledges the links between all these dimensions and underscores the window of opportunity that the region has now to sustain its wealth of natural resources, lock-in resource-efficient and resilient infrastructure, attract investment, and create employment in the increasingly dynamic and competitive sectors of green technology and renewable energy.

    Some key policy recommendations are that these challenges can be met by scaling up existing attempts to strengthen governance and reform countries’ economic structure; mainstreaming green growth into national development plans and government processes; accounting for the essential ecosystem services provided by natural capital, ending open-access natural resource exploitation; and guiding the sustainable growth of cities to ensure well-being and prosperity.

  • 3-November-2014

    English

    Regional Perspectives on Aid for Trade

    Deepening economic integration via regional co-operation has emerged as a key priority in the reform strategies of most developing economies over the past decade. This is evidenced by the explosive growth in bilateral and regional trading agreements in which they now participate. Regional aid for trade can help developing countries spur regional economic integration, enhance competitiveness, and plug into regional production networks.

    Based on a rich set of experiences regarding regional aid for trade projects and programmes, the study finds that regional aid for trade offers great potential as a catalyst for growth, development and poverty reduction. The study recommends greater emphasis on regional aid for trade as a means of improving regional economic integration and development prospects. While regional aid for trade faces many practical implementation challenges, experience has shown that associated problems are not insurmountable but do require thorough planning, careful project formulation, and prioritization on the part of policy makers.

  • 7-October-2014

    English

    Mainstreaming on cross-cutting issues

    This booklet outlines 7 important lessons on mainstreaming of cross-cutting issues such as gender equality and the environment in all DAC peer reviews in recognition of their importance in development co-operation.

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  • 7-October-2014

    English

    Mobilising Resources for Sustainable Development - Infographic

    Mobilising Resources for Sustainable Development - Infographic

    Related Documents
  • 1-October-2014

    English

    Resilience to support stabilisation in Lebanon

    Lebanon is currently facing a range of shocks related to the crisis in Syria. This systems analysis identifies the key assets that society needs to be resilient to risks. Participants identified the strengths of the Lebanese system that have allowed Lebanon to remain resilient in the face of major shocks.

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  • 22-September-2014

    English

    OECD-CPI Dialogue: Improving Transparency and Accountability through Enhanced Tracking of Climate Finance Flows

    The OECD and CPI organised a Dialogue on "Improving Transparency and Accountability through Enhanced Tracking of Climate Finance Flows" on 22 September in New York.

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  • 15-September-2014

    English

    Accountability and Democratic Governance - Orientations and Principles for Development

    The ability of citizens to demand accountability and more open government is fundamental to good governance. There is growing recognition of the need for new approaches to the ways in which donors support accountability, but no broad agreement on what changed practice looks like. This publication aims to provide more clarity on the emerging practice. Based on four country studies Mali, Mozambique, Peru and Uganda, a survey of donor innovations and cutting-edge analysis in this field, and the findings of a series of special high-level international dialogues on how to best support accountability support to parliaments, political parties, elections and the media. The publication takes the view that a wholesale shift in behaviour is required by parts of the development assistance community - moving outside conventional comfort zones and changing reflexes towards new approaches to risk taking, analysis and programming around systems of accountability and ‘do no harm’ efforts in political engagement.

    This piece is aimed at a range of development practitioners, as well as a wider audience, including civil society actors and citizens around the world who interact with donors working on accountability support.

  • 11-September-2014

    English

    Few and Far - The Hard Facts on Stolen Asset Recovery

    Corruption has a devastating impact on developing and transition countries, with estimates of $20 billion to $40 billion per year stolen by public officials, a figure equivalent to 20 to 40 percent of official development assistance flows. The return of the proceeds of corruption— asset recovery—can have a significant development impact. Returns can be used directly for development purposes, such as improvements in the health and education sectors and reintegration of displaced persons, with additional benefits of improved international co-operation and enhanced capacity of law enforcement and financial management officials. Development agencies and those committed to development effectiveness have a role in the asset recovery process. They have made international commitments to fight corruption and recover the proceeds of corruption in the Third High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness: Accra Agenda for Actions, held in Accra, Ghana, in 2008, and in the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness: Partnership for Effective Development, held in Busan, Republic of Korea, in 2011. Despite these efforts, there has been difficulty in translating these commitments into concrete action. This StAR-OECD publication reports on how OECD countries are performing on asset recovery.

    Drawing on data collected between 2006 and 2012, the report provides recommendations and good practices, and suggests specific actions for development agencies. Few and Far is primarily intended to support the anti-corruption and asset recovery efforts of developed and developing jurisdictions, with a particular focus on actions for development agencies. In addition, civil society organisations engaged in governance and development issues may wish to use these findings and recommendations in their reports and advocacy efforts.

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