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  • 1-April-2019

    English

    Engaging Local Employers in Skills Development in Australia

    This report focuses on how to better engage employers to increase participation in apprenticeship and other work-based skills development opportunities, which support local economic development objectives. The report begins with the description of relevant economic and labor market condition in Australia and across states and territories.A key part of this project is the implementation of an employer-based survey in Australia, which gathers information from employers about their skills needs and barriers to apprenticeship participation. The project also takes a case study approach to understand various implementation strengths and weaknesses in Australia. The aim is to understand the interaction between national, state and local programmes and policies while offering practical advice to improve coordination and the participation of employers based on international best practices. For each case study area, interviews were undertaken with local stakeholders in the fields of vocational training, employment, and economic development in order to collect evidence around local actions being taken to boost participation in apprenticeship and other work-based training programmes.
  • 30-January-2019

    English, PDF, 339kb

    Services Trade Restrictiveness Index Country Note: Australia

    A two-page OECD summary and analysis of the Services Trade Restrictiveness Index results for Australia.

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  • 30-January-2019

    English

    Australia needs to intensify efforts to meet its 2030 emissions goal

    Australia has made some progress replacing coal with natural gas and renewables in electricity generation yet remains one of the most carbon-intensive OECD countries and one of the few where greenhouse gas emissions (excluding land use and forestry) have risen in the past decade. The country will fall short of its 2030 emissions target without a major effort to move to a low-carbon model, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 30-January-2019

    English

    OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Australia 2019

    Australia has managed to decouple economic growth from the main environmental pressures and has made impressive progress in expanding protected areas. However, it is one of the most resource- and carbon-intensive OECD countries, and the state of its biodiversity is poor and worsening.  Advancing towards a greener economy will require strengthening climate-change policy and mainstreaming biodiversity more effectively across sectors.This is the third Environmental Performance Review of Australia. It evaluates progress towards sustainable development and green growth, and includes special features on threatened species protection and sustainable use of biodiversity and chemical management.
  • 21-January-2019

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 9-décembre-2018

    Français

    Etude économique de l'Australie 2018

    Avec 27 années de croissance économique positive, l'Australie a démontré une capacité remarquable d'élévation régulière du niveau de vie de sa population et d'absorption des chocs économiques.

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  • 5-December-2018

    English, PDF, 467kb

    Revenue Statistics: Key findings for Australia

    The tax-to-GDP ratio in Australia decreased by 0.1 percentage points from 27.9% in 2015 to 27.8% in 2016.* The corresponding figures for the OECD average were an increase of 0.3 percentage points from 33.7% to 34.0% over the same period.

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  • 4-December-2018

    English, PDF, 650kb

    Good jobs for all in a changing world of work: The new OECD Jobs Strategy – Key findings for Australia

    The digital revolution, globalisation and demographic changes are transforming labour markets at a time when policy makers are also struggling with slow productivity and wage growth and high levels of income inequality. The new OECD Jobs Strategy provides a comprehensive framework and policy recommendations to help countries address these challenges

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  • 28-November-2018

    English

    Recruiting Immigrant Workers: Australia 2018

    Australia has always been a nation of immigrants. More than one quarter of its population in 2015 was born abroad. Immigrants make an important economic and demographic contribution and help address skill and labour shortages. Labour migration is managed through a complex, but well-functioning and effective system which sets and respects annual migration targets. In recent years, the labour migration system has shifted from a mainly supply-driven system to a system where demand-driven migration represents close to half of the permanent skilled migration programme and demand-driven temporary migration has also risen sharply. In addition, two-step migration has gained ground in recent years. The review examines the implications of these changes for the composition of immigrants and their labour market outcomes. Moreover, it discusses recent changes in the tools used to manage labour migration and provides a detailed analysis on the impact of the introduction of SkillSelect on the efficiency of the system. Finally, the review discusses the extent to which the current labour migration system responds to the labour market needs of Australia's States and Territories.
  • 7-November-2018

    English, PDF, 537kb

    Stemming the Superbug Tide in Australia

    Resistance proportions for eight antibiotic-bacterium pairs in Australia have increased in recent years, from 7% in 2005 to 10% in 2015, and could go up to 12% by 2030, should current trends in antibiotic consumption, population and economic growth continue into the future. Resistance proportions in Australia were lower than the OECD average in 2015 (17%).

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