By Date


  • 18-May-2017

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Bad Neuenahr, 18-19 May 2017

    The Secretary-General was in Bad Neuenahr, Germany, on 18-19 May 2017 to attend the G20 Labour and Employment Ministers Meeting entitled "Towards and Inclusive Future - Shaping the World of Work". He delivered remarks at Thematic Sessions “Future of Work”, “Promoting fair and effective labour market integration of regular migrants and recognised refugees" ” and “Fostering decent work for sustainable global supply chain”.

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  • 18-May-2017

    English

    G20 Labour and Employment Ministers Meeting: Shaping the Future of Work

    Globalisation, demographic trends and technological change are transforming jobs in our economy. 9% of jobs across OECD countries could be automated in the next 15-20 years and a further 25% are at risk of significant change. The risk in emerging economies is even larger. According to recent studies, China and India together account for the largest technically automatable employment potential.

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  • 13-April-2017

    English

    Towards a Better Globalisation - How Germany Can Respond to the Crisis

    People in many countries, especially advanced countries, are expressing growing discontent about globalisation. They feel that its benefits have accrued mostly to a small and already well-off segment of the population. In addition, many citizens are dissatisfied with the way economic integration has been advanced. They complain about too little transparency and too many conflicts of interests between policy makers and firms. Several of the negative effects feeding the discontent have more to do with technological change than with globalisation per se, but the two are closely intertwined. Moreover, the policies put in place to alleviate negative impacts of economic openness on some groups, industries and regions have not always worked as intended, and global rule-making has not kept up with reality. Given its many benefits, reversing economic integration is not a solution. Rather, we need to find ways to make it work for all. This report sets out what needs to be done to advance a fairer and more inclusive globalisation – at the global level, at the European level and within Germany.

  • 11-April-2017

    English, PDF, 2,843kb

    Towards a Better Globalisation: How Germany can respond to the critics

    Citizens in many countries are expressing dissatisfaction with how they believe trade, technology and immigration are affecting their daily lives. While much of this discontent can be traced back to the global economic crisis, its root causes are more complex. What can be done at the Global, European and German level?

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  • 6-April-2017

    English, PDF, 418kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Germany

    Germany had the 2nd highest tax wedge among the 35 OECD member countries in 2016. The country had the 3rd highest position in 2015. The average single worker in Germany faced a tax wedge of 49.4% in 2016 compared with the OECD average of 36.0%.

  • 28-March-2017

    English

    Tax and Skills: Key findings for all countries

    These country specific notes provide figures and commentary from the Taxation and Skills publication that examines how tax policy can encourage skills development in OECD countries.

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  • 18-March-2017

    English

    G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting: Session 4 – International Taxation

    International tax matters remain an important priority as you work to ensure that the progress made in the last few years is embedded through coherent, global implementation. My report for this meeting provides you with the latest update on the work of the Inclusive Framework on BEPS, which now has over 90 members.

  • 18-March-2017

    English

    G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting: Session 3 – International Financial Architecture

    As you probably know, the OECD Code of Liberalisation of Capital Movements is the sole multilateral agreement among state parties, signed by 34 OECD and 12 G20 members, aimed at ensuring openness, accountability and transparency in cross-border capital flow policies.

  • 17-March-2017

    English

    OECD’s 2017 Going for Growth: Policies for Growth to Benefit All

    Going for Growth is the OECD’s flagship publication on structural policies. Its purpose is to help policymakers set reform agendas for the wellbeing of their citizens and to achieve strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth.

  • 16-March-2017

    English

    Institute of International Finance (IIF) G20 Conference

    I am very pleased and thankful to the IIF for having invited me to speak on a topic that is at the heart of the OECD’s business, namely world trade and the global economy.

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