By Date


  • 23-May-2017

    English

    Petersberg Climate Dialogue: Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth

    Governments around the world are striving to re-ignite growth in their economies. Widening inequalities – often related to the economic slowdown – are forcing a rethink of how the benefits of growth are shared.

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  • 23-May-2017

    English

    International Conference: Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth

    This morning I was pleased to hand over to Chancellor Merkel the major OECD report, Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth. I took the opportunity to congratulate the Chancellor for putting the issue of climate squarely on the G20 agenda.

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  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Berlin, 22-23 May 2017

    The Secretary-General wwas in Berlin on 22-23 May 2017 to attend the Petersberg Climate Dialogue where he delivered remarks at the Session on “Climate Change as catalyst for sustainable economic growth and well-being” and presented the OECD report “Investing in Climate - Investing in Growth”.

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  • 19-May-2017

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Berlin, 19-20 May 2017

    The Secretary-General was in Berlin on 19-20 May 2017 to attend the G20 Health Ministers’ Meeting where he delivered remarks at the session on “Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance”.

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  • 18-May-2017

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Bad Neuenahr, 18-19 May 2017

    The Secretary-General was in Bad Neuenahr, Germany, on 18-19 May 2017 to attend the G20 Labour and Employment Ministers Meeting entitled "Towards and Inclusive Future - Shaping the World of Work". He delivered remarks at Thematic Sessions “Future of Work”, “Promoting fair and effective labour market integration of regular migrants and recognised refugees" ” and “Fostering decent work for sustainable global supply chain”.

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  • 18-May-2017

    English

    G20 Labour and Employment Ministers Meeting: Shaping the Future of Work

    Globalisation, demographic trends and technological change are transforming jobs in our economy. 9% of jobs across OECD countries could be automated in the next 15-20 years and a further 25% are at risk of significant change. The risk in emerging economies is even larger. According to recent studies, China and India together account for the largest technically automatable employment potential.

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  • 13-April-2017

    English

    Towards a Better Globalisation - How Germany Can Respond to the Crisis

    People in many countries, especially advanced countries, are expressing growing discontent about globalisation. They feel that its benefits have accrued mostly to a small and already well-off segment of the population. In addition, many citizens are dissatisfied with the way economic integration has been advanced. They complain about too little transparency and too many conflicts of interests between policy makers and firms. Several of the negative effects feeding the discontent have more to do with technological change than with globalisation per se, but the two are closely intertwined. Moreover, the policies put in place to alleviate negative impacts of economic openness on some groups, industries and regions have not always worked as intended, and global rule-making has not kept up with reality. Given its many benefits, reversing economic integration is not a solution. Rather, we need to find ways to make it work for all. This report sets out what needs to be done to advance a fairer and more inclusive globalisation – at the global level, at the European level and within Germany.

  • 11-April-2017

    English, PDF, 2,843kb

    Towards a Better Globalisation: How Germany can respond to the critics

    Citizens in many countries are expressing dissatisfaction with how they believe trade, technology and immigration are affecting their daily lives. While much of this discontent can be traced back to the global economic crisis, its root causes are more complex. What can be done at the Global, European and German level?

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  • 6-April-2017

    English, PDF, 418kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Germany

    Germany had the 2nd highest tax wedge among the 35 OECD member countries in 2016. The country had the 3rd highest position in 2015. The average single worker in Germany faced a tax wedge of 49.4% in 2016 compared with the OECD average of 36.0%.

  • 28-March-2017

    English

    Tax and Skills: Key findings for all countries

    These country specific notes provide figures and commentary from the Taxation and Skills publication that examines how tax policy can encourage skills development in OECD countries.

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