Publications & Documents


  • 15-January-2016

    English

    Aid to the Water and Sanitation sector

    The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) collects aid flows at activity level based on a standard methodology and agreed definitions. The Aid to Water Supply and Sanitation sector is broken down into eleven sub sectors including policy, sanitation, supply, rivers and waste.

  • 8-January-2016

    English

    Transport and environment

    An efficient transport sector is important for economic development and for the wellbeing of people. However, transport activities can generate various negative environmental impacts. The OECD has carried out several studies to identify instruments and other approaches for reconciling transport and environmental policies. Upcoming event: Annual International Transport Forum on 18-20 May 2016 in Leipzig, Germany.

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  • 18-December-2015

    English

    Sector-level approach to estimating mobilised private climate finance: The case of renewable energy - Environment Working Paper

    In order to help address climate finance-related information needs under the UNFCCC, this paper explores the extent to which currently-available secondary data make it possible to estimate private finance mobilised by developed countries for climate action in developing countries.

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  • 15-December-2015

    English

    How OECD and IEA contributed to COP21 - Insights blog

    With the world welcoming the new comprehensive global climate agreement at COP21 aiming to limit the global average temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius, it is worth noting the significant contribution that the OECD family has made. These contributions were aptly summarized in a useful joint statement by the secretariats of OECD, IEA, International Transport Forum and Nuclear Energy Agency right after COP21 kicked off.

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  • 14-December-2015

    English

    Beyond COP21: Boosting systems innovation for green growth

    The hard work starts now. The Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to cut emissions submitted by 160 countries – even if fully implemented – do not add up to the level of emissions reduction needed to keep the global average temperature rises below 2 degrees. So how can we close this emissions gap?

  • 12-December-2015

    English

    Statement by the OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría on COP21 Agreement

    This is a watershed day for the world and especially heartening for the OECD as one of the first international bodies to call for zero net emissions in the second half of the century, for a price on carbon and for greater efforts to channel finance into the low carbon economy.

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  • 11-December-2015

    English

    OECD at #COP21

    World leaders faced a fundamental dilemma: take strong action to address the risks associated with climate change, or see the ability to limit this threat slip from their grasp. Check out how the OECD contributed to get a successful outcome on 12 December at COP21 in Paris.

  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Climate disclosure: knowledge powers change

    Everybody is interested in the impacts of what companies are doing and the environmental practices and impacts of doing business are coming under increasing scrutiny. OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría looks at how both governments and investors are ready to scale up climate disclosure and the use of climate information.

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  • 10-December-2015

    English

    Getting the most out of corporate climate change disclosure

    We have more and more evidence about the risks that climate change poses to our planet. But climate change also threatens the long-term health and stability of financial markets and the global economy. And we don’t know nearly enough to understand and measure these risks.

  • 10-December-2015

    English

    Rethinking fiduciary duty for a more sustainable planet

    If we want to get serious about unlocking green investment, we need to get serious about systematically integrating climate risks into our understanding of fiduciary duty.

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