Publications & Documents


  • 16-December-2010

    English

    Stimulating Low-Carbon Vehicle Technologies

    Governments around the world are increasingly intervening in automobile markets to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions of CO2 from new vehicles. This report reviews the rationale for such intervention and examines measures for maximum effectiveness and minimum cost.

    The Round Table brought together economists, policy makers and auto engineers with the aim of advancing understanding of why car markets currently fail to deliver sufficient fuel economy. It started by questioning whether any additional measures would be necessary once an appropriate price for carbon dioxide is established via fuel taxes. It confirmed that there are indeed market imperfections that merit additional government intervention. Fuel economy and CO2 regulations are an essential part of the package. The key to maximising the benefits of such regulations is long-term planning. The longer the timeframe, the less industry investment is handicapped by uncertainty.

    Subsidies to electric vehicles are more problematic because of the risks of prematurely picking winning technologies and creating subsidy dependence. And electricity production has yet to be decarbonised. However, intervention to steer innovation in this direction is merited so long as the risks of not attaining climate policy targets are seen as higher than the risks of intervention.

  • 15-December-2010

    English

    Greening Growth in Japan - Environment Working Paper No. 28

    This paper assesses Japan’s progress in moving towards such an environmentally friendly growth pattern. It summarises Japan’s achievements and challenges in decoupling environmental pressures from economic performance.

  • 12-December-2010

    English

    Building the new future

    “We cannot return to business-as-usual” has been a constant refrain since the economic crisis started. How can new growth sources be tapped? What about fighting poverty, and ensuring food and energy supplies while safeguarding our planet? OECD experts discuss the issues.

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  • 10-December-2010

    English

    United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 16)

    At COP16, Angel Gurría stated that "Green and Growth go well together and can become a win-win outcome for advanced, emerging and developing countries. (...) Cancun should; Cancun must; Cancun can!"

  • 10-December-2010

    English, , 384kb

    Update on the OECD Work on Water - Flyer

    This flyer provides an overview of OECD's continuing strong commitment to providing policy guidance on improving water policy through its work on the economic, institutional and policy responses to the water challenge.

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  • 9-December-2010

    English

    Tackling climate change: How to ensure the necessary finance flows

    In his remarks, A. Gurría said that countries need to be ambitious in taking unilateral actions and that a cost-effective approach to reducing emissions could cost just a fraction of a percentage point of GDP per year.

  • 8-December-2010

    English

    Climate change: yes we can!

    To sum-up, Green and Growth can and should go together, but we need to put the right policies in place. The OECD is working to help countries reconcile fighting climate change with strengthening the economy and creating jobs.

  • 8-December-2010

    English

    Climate change: COP16 Cancún

    The UN Climate Change Conference was held in Cancún, Mexico (COP16, 29 Nov-10 Dec 2010). What were the actions taken? For OECD experts involved at Cancún, policy focused on financing, market solutions and technological change.

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  • 6-December-2010

    English

    Economics of Climate Change Mitigation

    OECD’s modelling work supports governments in identifying least-cost policies or policy mixes to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and assesses the cost and impacts of possible post-2012 international frameworks.

  • 1-December-2010

    English

    Valuation of Environment-Related Health Risks for Children

    Is the value of reducing environment-related health risks greater for children than for adults? A research project involving leading research teams has sought to answer this question through the implementation of surveys of parents in three OECD countries.

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