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  • 28-February-2019

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    Case study: Digital Finance and Citizen Action

    Opportunities for climate mitigation and adaptation lie in the shift to climate-smart infrastructure, as laid out in the report "Financing Climate Futures: Rethinking Infrastructure", by the OECD, UN Environment and the WorldBank Group. This report shows that limiting warming to 1.5°C will involve “annual average investment needs in the energy system of around US$2.4 trillion” between 2016 and 2035.

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  • 28-February-2019

    English, PDF, 3,091kb

    Case Study: Achieving Clean Energy Access in Sub-Saharan Africa

    A clean energy revolution in sub-Saharan Africa is urgently needed to win the fight against energy poverty, to promote robust development and to make it more sustainable. As part as the Financing Climate Futures initiative by the OECD, UN Environment and the WorldBank Group, this report takes an in-depth look at the challenges and opportunities to provide clean energy access in sub-Saharan Africa.

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  • 19-February-2019

    English, PDF, 1,889kb

    EPR Denmark Review Process 2018-19

    Environmental Performance Reviews provide an independent assessment and targeted recommendations aimed at improving policies that impact the environment. The third Environmental Performance Review of Denmark will take stock of the progress made since 2007. OECD Member countries will approve the recommendations of this report in May 2019. http://oe.cd/epr

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  • 19-February-2019

    English, PDF, 3,783kb

    Highlights: OECD Environmental Performance Review of Turkey 2019 (Turkish)

    Highlights: OECD Environmental Performance Review of Turkey 2019 (Turkish) Öne çıkanlar: OECD Çevresel Performans İncelemeleri Türkiye 2019

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  • 19-February-2019

    English

    OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Turkey 2019

    Turkey is the fastest growing OECD economy with rapidly increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Since 2008, its economic growth has been relatively decoupled from air emissions, energy use, waste generation and water consumption. However, the high resource intensity of Turkey’s economy and its heavy reliance on fossil fuels will continue to increase these environmental pressures in absolute terms. More progress is needed in the transition to a low-carbon, circular economy to improve the country’s environmental performance.This is the third Environmental Performance Review of Turkey. It evaluates progress towards sustainable development and green growth, with special features on climate change and urban wastewater management.
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  • 19-February-2019

    English

    Turkey needs to step up investment in renewables to curb emissions

    Turkey will see its greenhouse gas emissions continue their steady rise of recent years without concrete actions to improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy sources, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 19-February-2019

    English

    Find an environmental country review

    Since the inception of the Environmental Performance Reviews programme in 1992, most of the OECD member countries have been reviewed twice. The third cycle of reviews effectively began in 2010, with a new approach that systematically incorporates key environmental trends, policy-making environment and green growth, plus two thematic chapters.

  • 14-February-2019

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Thailand (Volume 2) - In-depth Analysis and Recommendations

    Thailand is a fast emerging country that aspires to become a high-income economy by 2037. Still, Thailand’s growth path has created large disparities that risk obstructing the next stage of development. This report lays out three transitions that Thailand needs to master to build capabilities and sustain faster but also more inclusive economic growth. First, the country should move from a growth path dominated by few and geographically concentrated sources of innovation to one that focuses on unlocking the full potential of all regions. Second, to support a new growth agenda, it should organise multi-level governance and the relationship between the many layers of government more effectively, particularly with regards to financial resources. Last but not least, Thailand should focus on water and environment, moving from a resource-intensive growth path with costly natural disasters to one characterised by sustainable development. In the case of water, this means moving from ad-hoc responses to effective management of water security.
  • 14-February-2019

    English

    Rethinking Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean Economy

    This new OECD report on the ocean economy emphasises the growing importance of science and technologies in improving the sustainable economic development of our seas and ocean. Marine ecosystems sit at the heart of many of the world’s global challenges: food, medicines, new sources of clean energy, climate regulation, job creation and inclusive growth. But we need to safeguard and improve the health of marine ecosystems to support our ever-growing use of marine resources. Innovation in science and technology will play a key role in reconciling these two objectives. This report identifies three priority areas for action based on a number of in-depth case studies: 1) approaches that produce win-win outcomes for ocean business and the ocean environment across a range of marine and maritime applications; 2) the creation of ocean-economy innovation networks; and 3) new pioneering initiatives to improve measurement of the ocean economy.
  • 12-February-2019

    English

    Making the most of tourism in Indonesia to promote sustainable regional development

    Tourism has boomed in Indonesia in recent years and is already one of the main sources of foreign-currency earnings.

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