Publications & Documents


  • 27-November-2015

    English

    Do environmental policies matter for productivity growth?

    This study presents new evidence on the role of environmental policies – stringency, as well as design and implementation features - for productivity growth.

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  • 27-November-2015

    English

    Overcoming climate change and unleashing a dynamic, zero-carbon economy

    The UN Conference on Climate Change (COP21) in Paris 30 November-11 December is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reach a new international agreement to combat climate change and accelerate our transition to a low-carbon economy. The “carbon entanglement” of our economies is keeping us on a collision course with nature.

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  • 26-November-2015

    English

    Innovation, Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability in the Netherlands

    The Dutch food, agriculture and horticulture sector is innovative and export oriented, with high value-added along the food chain and significant world export shares for many products. Continuous adoption of innovation has permitted to reach high levels of productivity and sustained productivity growth, in particular at the farm level, in a context of increasing environmental regulatory constraints. The challenge is whether marginal improvements in current technologies and know-how will be enough to pursue current rates of productivity growth – sustainably – and whether the innovation system will be able to generate the new ideas that are needed to face future challenges, including those linked to climate change.

  • 25-November-2015

    English

    What is green growth and how can it help deliver sustainable development?

    In the run up to Rio+20, governments must seize new opportunities to ensure that green growth - strong economies and a clean environment - offer the potential to increase the well-being of all citizens in all countries.

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  • 25-November-2015

    English

    OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: The Netherlands 2015

    This report is the third OECD review of environmental performance in the Netherlands. It evaluates progress towards sustainable development and green growth, with a focus on sustainable mobility, and waste and materials management.


    The OECD Environmental Performance Review Programme provides independent assessments of country progress in achieving domestic and international environmental policy commitments. The reviews are conducted to improve environmental performance, promote peer learning and enhance accountability. They are supported by a broad range of economic and environmental data, and provide policy-relevant recommendations.

    Each review cycle covers all OECD countries and selected partner economies. The most recent reviews include: Spain (2015), Poland (2015), Sweden (2014).

  • 25-November-2015

    English

    The Netherlands should strive to meet energy and environment challenges

    An early leader in environmental policy, the Netherlands has decoupled greenhouse gas emissions from economic growth and virtually eliminated landfilling over the past decade. Yet a very fossil fuel-intensive energy mix and looming pressures from traffic congestion and intensive farming are creating new challenges, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 24-November-2015

    English

    Climate change: Consequences of inaction

    Tackling climate change may be costly, but not tackling it will cost even more. And the longer we wait to act, the more our environment, our health and our economies will be damaged. Find out more about the likely impacts of rising GHG concentrations on global temperature, and how that will affect all of us.

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  • 24-November-2015

    English

    Household Consumption (EPIC)

    A ground-breaking OECD survey offers insights to policy-makers on the factors that influence household behaviour towards the environment. It provides answers to the key question: How can the impact of policies encouraging greener behaviour be heightened? It also provides a deeper understanding of behavioural responses to measures and how these may differ across households and regions.

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  • 24-November-2015

    English

    Adapting Transport Policy to Climate Change - Carbon Valuation, Risk and Uncertainty

    Transport accounts for nearly a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions from fuel combustion. The price attached to these emissions is critical to climate policies and emissions mitigation efforts in the sector. As the impact of emissions on climate does not depend on where CO2 is released, the price of carbon should be uniform. In reality, however, it varies immensely, reflecting the complexity of assessing climate impacts.
    This report reviews the three key challenges in considering the effects of carbon dioxide emissions in economic appraisal: the valuation of carbon dioxide emissions, the treatment of uncertainty in climate change and the approach used to discounting future costs and benefits. The report reviews current approaches in selected countries (France, Germany, Japan, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States) and provides examples of good practice and recommendations for national and international policy making.

     

  • 24-November-2015

    English

    CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2015

    In recognition of fundamental changes in the way governments approach energy related environmental issues, the IEA has prepared this publication on CO2 emissions from fuel combustion. This annual publication was first published in 1997 and has become an essential tool for analysts and policy makers in many international for a such as the Conference of the Parties, which will be meeting in Paris, France from 30 November to 11 December 2015.

    The data in this book are designed to assist in understanding the evolution of the emissions of CO2 from 1971 to 2013 for more than 140 countries and regions by sector and by fuel. Emissions were calculated using IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

     

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