Growth, Investment and the Low-Carbon Transition

WEBINAR

> GREEN TALKS ON NEW OECD REPORT "INVESTING IN CLIMATE, INVESTING GROWTH"

On 22 June 2017, our experts discussed the key findings of the OECD report "Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth" and how policy makers can generate growth-enhancing and climate-resilient reforms.



Missed the webinar? Video coming soon.

The report

Synthesis - Executive Summary

Explore more dataviz

 

Saving generated from reduced fossil fuel expenditure, Investing in Climate Investing in Growth (gif)

 

A shift of investment, Investing in Climate Investing in Growth (gif)

 

Three components of a well-aligned policy framework, Investing in Climate Investing in Growth (gif)

 

Emissions pathways to meet Paris Agreement objectives vary across country types, Investing in Climate Investing in Growth

 

All G20 countries have scope to improve infrastructure, Investing in Climate Investing in Growth (data viz)

 

G20 countries face different challenges in forging low-emission pathways, Investing in Climate Investing in Growth

 

Roughly 1/3 of commitments by the largest MDB to infrastructure sectors are climate-realted, Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth

 

Events - News release - Speeches - Blogs

OECD NEWS RELEASE and speeches - 23 may 2017 - berlin

Petersburg Climate Dialogue VII - Mr. Gurría talking at the Petersburg Climate Dialogue VII

 

Blogs and opinion editorial

  • "Climate: Towards a just transition, with no stranded workers and no stranded communities", by Sharan Burrow, General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) 

    Ambitious action on climate is an imperative. The G20 leaders have a chance to reinforce the Paris Climate Agreement and raise ambition with concrete measures to ensure significant progress towards net zero economies and reap the benefits of investment now in jobs and economic growth... Read the full blog post.

 

  • "What's Good for the Climate Can Be Good for Growth Too", by Catherine L. Mann, OECD Chief Economist

    On the one hand, governments are striving to re-ignite growth in a world of slowing productivity growth and rising inequality. Economic growth has been at best modest in the last decade in most G20 economies. The OECD projects a moderate pick-up of world GDP of around 3.5% in 2017 and 2018. But this will not suffice to maintain good levels of pensions, health and education, nor to create sufficient jobs for the young... Read the full blog post.

 

  • "Opening a new chapter in the infrastructure of Latin America", by Juan Pablo Bonilla, Manager of the Climate Change and Sustainable Development Sector, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

    In Latin America, as elsewhere, sustainable infrastructure plays a vital role in improving the quality of life and supporting economic growth. What many people don’t know is that sustainable infrastructure also has a lasting impact on climate resilience. Every year, natural disasters generate US$2 billion in costs in Latin America, not counting the incalculable loss of human life: in Colombia, my own country, the April 2017 rain-driven mudslides took the lives of more than 250 people... Read the full blog post.


  • "Getting climate infrastructure right - A stronger role for development banks", by Jorge Moreira da Silva, Director of the OECD Development Co-operation Directorate

    The 2015 Paris Agreement stipulates that global warming needs to be limited to well below 2 degrees Celsius to reduce the impact of climate change on human life. Yet, with the world’s population set to rise by more than 2 billion by 2030, the coming decade will see a leap in infrastructure investment — transportation, energy, water and sanitation — which could make or break the 2 degree goal... Read the full op ed.

OECD International conference on Tuesday 23 May 2017 - Berlin

Angel Gurria Petersberg Climate Dialogue 2017The OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría presented the results of the major OECD report "Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth" which provides a ground-breaking analysis of how low-emission and climate-resilient development can be achieved without compromising economic growth, competitiveness or well-being.


Below are some of the questions debated at an OECD-hosted international conference held on 23 May 2017 in Berlin, in collaboration with the German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety and in conjunction with the Petersberg Climate Dialogue.

  • How can governments ensure that climate-friendly growth policies provide a major boost to short-term growth while increasing longer-term resilience?
  • What development pathways will get us to the Paris Agreement outcomes?
  • How do investment flows need to change to get us there? What are the growth and structural implications of going low carbon?
  • How can governments create the conditions to drive a prosperous transition?


The conference took place in the context of the German G20 presidency and attended by decision-makers from a large number of countries, business representatives as well as high-level actors of international co-operation.

PAST EVENTS


A number of expert workshops have taken place to feed into the project:

Related event:

Project Background

The OECD undertook a major project on the economic growth and investment implications of the transition to a low-carbon, climate resilient economy in the context of the German G20 Presidency.

Bringing together the growth, development and climate agendas

Delivering on the Paris objectives will require fundamental shifts in our economies, including major changes in how capital is allocated.

The Growth, Investment and the Low-Carbon Transition project analyses how low-emission and climate-resilient development can be achieved without compromising economic growth, competitiveness, or well-being across the G20 group of countries and beyond.

Invigorating economic growth in the short-term does not necessarily equate with investing in emissions-intensive infrastructure and locking-in a high-carbon pathway. Escaping the low-growth trap that many countries currently find themselves in does not mean embracing a high-carbon future complete with future economic liabilities in terms of stranded assets and physical damages due to climate change impacts.

The project looks at a number of key questions surrounding the low-carbon transition:

  • 1. What development pathways will get us to the Paris outcome? 
  • 2. How do investment flows need to change to get us there?
  • 3. What are the growth and structural implications of going low-carbon?
  • 4. How can governments create the conditions to drive a prosperous transition?

 

Project flyer - PDF

An inclusive process relevant to all G20 countries

The project is being undertaken as part of the OECD’s Programme of Work and Budget with the support of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety, and in the context of the German G20 Presidency. It is guided by an Advisory Council of 14 high-profile academic, government, business and civil society members. The work also benefits from the input of a number of partner institutions from G20 countries, covering the range of issues being addressed.

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