Climate change

Global Forum on the Environment and Climate Change - organised by the Climate Change Expert Group (CCXG) - September 2017

 

 

The CCXG Global Forum on the Environment and Climate Change was held on 12-13 September 2017 at the OECD Conference Centre in Paris. This Forum brought together approximately 200 delegates from a wide range of developed and developing countries, as well as representatives from business, inter-governmental organisations, research organisations, environmental NGOs and other relevant institutions. Two sessions of the Forum were organised in partnership with the Council on Energy Environment & Water (CEEW). The issues discussed included the 2018 facilitative dialogue, transparency of mitigation action and climate finance, and accounting for NDCs. 

The Forum provided a neutral space outside of the UNFCCC negotiations for participants to develop a shared understanding of the transparency-related provisions in the Paris Agreement and how these might be implemented. The Forum was also an opportunity for delegates to have an objective discussion of the priorities and timeline for related work to be undertaken by the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Paris Agreement and other subsidiary bodies under the UNFCCC.

 

summaries of breakout GROUPS

 

Agenda, presentations and final list of participants

 

DAY 1 -  Tuesday 12 September 2017

9:30 – 09:45 Welcoming remarks

Chair: Jacob Werksman
Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

9:45 – 10:15 Opening Plenary : Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth

Governments are faced with the triple challenges of re-invigorating growth, improving livelihoods and addressing climate change. This session will highlight how acting on climate change can also be good for growth, provided the right policies and structural reforms are put in place.

 

10:15 – 11:15 Plenary: Success factors for the 2018 facilitative dialogue

Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

The 2018 facilitative dialogue’s mandate is “to take stock of the collective efforts of Parties in relation to progress towards the long-term goal” referred to in Article 4.1 and to “inform the preparation of nationally determined contributions” pursuant to Article 4.8. As discussions on the scope and modalities of the dialogue are ongoing, this session will highlight different views on what factors would render the FD2018 a “success”.

  • "2018 facilitative dialogue: Identifying options for outputs and outcomes and key questions for modalities", M. Vaidyula and Ellis, J. (2017, draft)  
  • Marcia Levaggi, Argentina
  • Ulrik Lenaerts, Belgium
  • Fu Sha, China

Discussion question:

  1. What factors related to the scope or results of discussions, participation of stakeholders, points of action would make the FD2018 a success?

 

11:45 – 13:15 Breakout Group 1: 2018 facilitative dialogue (FD2018): Options for outputs and outcomes

Co-facilitators: Ilze Prūse, Latvia and Kaveh Guilanpour, Marshall Islands

The FD2018’s mandate does not explicitly call for any outputs or outcomes. This session will explore possible outcomes that could result from the 2018 facilitative dialogue. This session will also address what possible outputs, inputs and modalities could be relevant to enable possible outcomes.

  • "2018 facilitative dialogue: Identifying options for outputs and outcomes and key questions for modalities", M. Vaidyula and Ellis, J. (2017, draft)  
  • "Information needs for the 2018 facilitative dialogue: options and issues", Ellis, J. and M. Vaidyula (2017)

Discussion questions:

  1. What are priority outcomes of the 2018 facilitative dialogue? 
  2. What are the associated implications for outputs, inputs and modalities?

     

    11:45 – 13:15 Breakout Group A: Accounting for diverse NDCs: Unpacking concepts and options

    Co-facilitators: Kelley Kizzier, Ireland and Harald Winkler, University of Cape Town (UCT)

    The diversity of approaches used by Parties to express mitigation goals in their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) presents challenges in understanding, comparing and aggregating outcomes. Accounting is needed to allow Parties to track individual progress towards their own mitigation goal, understand others’ progress, and assess collective progress towards to the long-term mitigation goal. This session aims to unpack the concepts and options around the nature of accounting for diverse NDCs.

    • “Accounting for mitigation targets in Nationally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement”, C. Hood and Soo, C. (2017, draft)

    Discussion question:

    1. To what degree can the accounting guidance be based on general principles for all NDC target types, and where would specific guidance for individual NDC types be useful?

     

    14:30 – 16:00 Breakout Group 2: Transparency of reporting on finance: Enhanced reporting on finance provided and mobilised

    Co-facilitators: Janine Felson, Belize and Outi Honkatukia, Finland

    The modalities, procedures and guidelines (MPGs) for the enhanced transparency framework for finance-related information are to build on current arrangements for reporting, measurement and verification. The MPGs should also reflect the changes introduced by the Paris Agreement to the reporting of finance provided and mobilised, both in terms of reporting Parties and scope of reported information, in particular with respect to reporting on private finance mobilised by public interventions. This session will highlight experience with reporting of finance provided and mobilised, or of using this reported information. It will also explore the remaining challenges to meet the purpose of the enhanced transparency framework for support, and specific options for the MPGs to overcome these challenges.

    • “Enhancement of mitigation and finance reporting”, L. Vallejo, Moarif. S, and Halimanjaya, A. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1. What are the key challenges to be overcome in tracking and reporting climate finance provided and mobilised under the transparency framework for support and how might they be addressed?
    2. How could modalities, procedures and guidelines (MPGs) best enhance the reporting of private finance ‘mobilised’ through public interventions?

     

    14:30 – 16:00 Breakout Group B: Transparecncy of reporting on mitigation: Country experiences with reporting - Organised in partnership with CEEW

    Co-facilitators: Arunabha Gosh, CEEW and Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun, Mexico

    As per Decision 1/CP.21, the modalities, procedures and guidelines for the Paris Agreement’s enhanced transparency framework will “build upon” the current measurement, reporting and verifications system, and draw on experiences from the Convention. With a focus on the reporting of mitigation-related information, this session will explore Parties’ experiences to date under the current reporting system, and encourage participants to examine and share lessons from their current experience to inform the development of future reporting modalities, procedures and guidelines.  

    • “Enhancement of mitigation and finance reporting”, L. Vallejo, Moarif. S, and Halimanjaya, A. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1. In reporting mitigation-related information, which 2-3 elements have been the most challenging to provide and why? 
    2. What processes, decisions or circumstances – domestic or international – have most contributed to improvements in mitigation-related reporting and how might governments build on these?  

     

    16:30 – 18:00 Breakout Group 3: Transparency of reporting on finance: Enhanced reporting on finance received and needed 

    Co-facilitators: Janine Felson, Belize and Outi Honkatukia, Finland

    Compared with the reporting of finance provided and mobilised, the Paris Agreement makes only marginal changes with respect to the reporting of finance received and needed. This session will explore how the MPGs for reporting on finance received and needed could be enhanced, building on experience to date and improving the quality of information reported by developing countries. Participants are encouraged to focus on identifying the expected benefits of doing so, and suggesting options for improving the information reported to date. (NB: Capacity needs for transparency are discussed specifically in breakout group E.)

      

    • “Enhancement of mitigation and finance reporting”, L. Vallejo, Moarif. S, and Halimanjaya, A. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1. What are the key challenges and potential benefits in tracking and reporting climate finance received, particularly its use and impact? How might the challenges be addressed and the benefits maximised? 
    2. What approaches to estimating finance needs could best support domestic climate policy planning?

       

    16:30 – 18:00 Breakout Group C: Transparency of reporting on mitigation: Issues and options for an enhanced framework - Organised in partnership with CEEW 

    Co-facilitators: Arunabha Gosh, CEEW and Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun, Mexico

    Parties to the UNFCCC are aiming to develop a set of modalities, procedures and guidelines for the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement, including for reporting on mitigation-related information. In this session, participants are encouraged to have a frank exchange about where Parties may need to dedicate time and energy to address key challenges and issues related to developing reporting guidance, what they see as the most feasible options for addressing key challenges, and how to explore these options between now and COP24.  

    • “Enhancement of mitigation and finance reporting”, L. Vallejo, Moarif. S, and Halimanjaya, A. (2017, draft)

     Discussion questions:

    1. What are the 2-3 main issues that may present a challenge when developing common modalities, procedures and guidelines for mitigation reporting? 
    2. What options exist for managing each issue, are any options preferable and what concrete steps can Parties take to move forward with these options?

       

    DAY 2 -  Wednesday 13 September 2017

    9:30 – 11:00 Breakout Group 4: 2018 facilitative dialogue : Role of non-party stakeholders (NPS)

    Facilitator: Niklas Höhne, New Climate Institute 

    The FD2018 mandate specifies that the dialogue is to be convened “among Parties”. Many Parties have however have highlighted the importance of NPS input feeding into the dialogue. This session explores how input from NPS can be leveraged by the FD2018. In particular, the session will introduce ideas of the type of information and means in which NPS input can feed into the FD2018.

    • “Information needs for the facilitave dialogue: options and issues”, Ellis, J. and M. Vaidyula (2017) 

    Discussion questions:

    1. What is the value added of NPS input to the FD2018? How can NPS input be maximised?
    2. How can different types of NPS contribute input?

     

    9:30 –11:00 Breakout Group D: Accounting within the NDC cycle

    Co-facilitators: Kelley Kizzier, Ireland and Harald Winkler, University of Cape Town (UCT)

    Under the Paris Agreement, Parties would “account for” their NDC goals after the end of the target year/period in order to measure actual achievement. Accounting guidance could also be useful at earlier stages in the NDC cycle; for example, at the time of communication to understand how NDC goals will be assessed, or during the implementation of an NDC to track progress and achievement.  This session discusses how accounting could be applied at various stages in the NDC cycle and how it relates to the timeframes for Parties’ reporting. 

    • “Accounting for mitigation targets in Nationally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement”, C. Hood and Soo, C. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1.  

      When to apply guidance on accounting in the NDC cycle: before, during and / or after implementation of NDCs?
    2. What are the implications of different reporting timelines for accounting?
    3.  

    11:30 –13:00 Breakout Group 5Next steps following the 2018 facilitative dialogue

    Co-facilitators: Ilze Prūse, Latvia and Kaveh Guilanpour, Marshall Islands

    This session looks to the period after the FD2018 and focuses on its potential role in informing the preparation of NDCs in line with CTU principles, as specified in the FD2018 mandate. The session will explore what type and format of information could better inform Parties in preparing their NDCs. The session will also explore how the FD2018 could support the identification of information relevant to enhancing CTU of NDCs.

    • “2018 facilitative dialogue: Identifying options for outputs and outcomes and key questions for modalities", M. Vaidyula and Ellis, J. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1. How could the FD2018 best inform the preparation of NDCs? 
    2. What role could the FD2018 play in identifying information relevant for CTU of NDCs?  

     

    11:30 –13:00 Breakout Group ECapacity needs for transparency

    Facilitator: Damiano Borgogno, UNDP 

    Fulfilling the provisions of the enhanced transparency framework established under the Paris Agreement will entail a significant effort for many Parties. As such, several initiatives within and outside the UNFCCC aim to provide dedicated support to build-up the in-country capacities needed for improved transparency. This session aims to provide negotiators with a better understanding of capacity issues as they relate to improving capacity to monitor and report information. Participants are encouraged to share their own experiences and discuss how capacity building initiatives could be improved.

    • Patricia Leite, Brazil 
    • Achala Abeysinghe, LDC Group
    • François Dejean, EEA

    Discussion questions:

    1.  

      How do countries identify and prioritise their capacity building needs for improving transparency? 
    2. What actions could enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of capacity building initiatives in helping countries improve transparency?

     

    14:30 – 15:15 Plenary: Short-term actions towards longer-term goals  

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group 

    A key challenge in the shorter-term is the alignment of goals, processes, and actions – such as pre-2020 action, the 2018 facilitative dialogue and its outcomes, development and implementation of NDCs – with long term goals such as those defined in Articles 2.1 and 4.1 of the Paris Agreement. In the short term, selected actions by countries may make long-term objectives more difficult to achieve. Keynote speaker Laurence Tubiana will lay out the challenges in aligning shorter-term goals and actions with long-term transition objectives, how countries are addressing these challenges, and the value in defining coherent transition pathways to link the short to long-term.

    • Laurence Tubiana, ECF

     

    15:15 – 16:00 Plenary : Co-facilitators' key takeaways from breakout groups  

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

    In this session, the facilitators will share their three key takeaways from each breakout group discussion.

     

    16:00 – 16:30 Closing Plenary: Reflections on next steps in 2017 and 2018

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

    In this session, representatives from the COP23 and COP24 presidencies will share insights on next steps and priorities during 2017 and 2018.

    • H.E. Deo Saran, Fiji
       
    • Przemysław Sobanski, Poland