Climate change

Climate Change Expert Group (CCXG) Global Forum - Sept 2014

 

This Global Forum was held at the IEA Conference Center, Paris (France). Organised by the OECD and the IEA,  it aimed to promote dialogue and enhance understanding between a wide range of countries on technical issues in the international climate change negotiations. This seminar is an informal meeting outside of the UNFCCC negotiations and discussions were non-attributed.

The Secretariat would like to thank Australia, Belgium, Finland, Germany, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK for their direct funding of the CCXG in 2014, and the OECD and the IEA for their in-kind support.

- AGENDA - 

Welcoming remarks and recap of outcomes of March 2014
by Maria van der Hoeven, Executive Director, IEA and Karine Hertzberg, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group
Opening Plenary: Promoting economic transformations to low-carbon and climate-resilient economies

Focus: Climate change is not simply an environmental issue. Addressing climate change will require governments to align policies across multiple areas, including economic, social, environmental, energy, trade, development co-operation, agriculture, innovation, as well as urban planning and transport policies. This opening plenary explored how we can tackle this daunting yet crucial challenge.

Speakers: Simon Upton (OECD), Emmanuel Dlamini (Swaziland), Maryke van Staden (ICLEI) and Natalie Unterstell (Brazil)

Key questions:

  1. How can policy alignment help to promote transformations to low-carbon and climate-resilient economies?
  2. How could the UNFCCC and other international processes help?

Plenary: Streamlining the UNFCCC process and enhancing inter-linkages

Focus: A plethora of mechanisms, arrangements and institutions for tackling climate change exists for mitigation, adaptation, finance, technology, capacity building and transparency, both within and outside the UNFCCC. This session took stock of the international regime that has been built up to date, identified where the gaps are, and considered how the 2015 Agreement could add maximum value to existing arrangements.

Speakers: Gregory Briner (OECD), Andrés Mogro (Ecuador) and MJ Mace (St Lucia)

Draft Background document: “Options for Streamlining the UNFCCC Process and Enhancing Inter-linkages in the Post-2020 Period” by Gregory Briner, Takayoshi Kato, Susanne Konrad and Christina Hood

Key questions:

  1. How could the 2015 Agreement help to streamline the UNFCCC process?
  2. Where is greater co-ordination and stronger inter-linkages between arrangements and bodies needed, both inside and outside the UNFCCC?

Breakout Group Climate Finance - Role of the 2015 agreement in mobilising climate finance

Co-facilitated by Anton Hilber (Switzerland) and Gilberto Arias (Dominican Republic)

Draft Background document: “The role of the 2015 agreement in mobilising climate finance” by Takayoshi Kato, Jane Ellis and Christa Clapp 

Session 1: Institutional arrangements to mobilise and allocate effective climate finance and ways to enhance enabling environments
How could the 2015 agreement directly or indirectly facilitate the effective mobilisation of climate finance at scale?  
How could the 2015 agreement help Parties to strengthen the push and pull factors for enhancing enabling environments for mobilising climate finance?

Takayoshi Kato (OECD)
Mariama Williams (South Centre)
Jérôme Bertrand-Hardy (Proparco)

Session 2: How the new agreement could help to mobilise domestic financial resources in developing countries with the broad use of the full range of the financial instruments and tools?

How could the new agreement support the use of the full range of financial instruments? 
What are the barriers and opportunities for the 2015 agreement to mobilise domestic financial resources in developing countries? 

Christopher Kaminker (OECD)
Christa Clapp (CICERO)
Isabel Cavelier Adarve (AILAC)
Cyrille Arnould (EIB)

Breakout Group Finance for Adaptation

Focus: A range of issues on scaling up finance for adaptation actions have arisen, such as, incentivising private sector investment, measuring and monitoring adaptation finance flows, and the thematic imbalance between adaptation and mitigation. The session focused on opportunities and barriers relating to those issues, and on how the 2015 Agreement could contribute to addressing these issues and scale up climate finance for adaptation.
Co-facilitated by Inka Gnittke (Germany) and Isabel Cavelier Adarve (AILAC)
Opportunities and barriers (for both contributors and recipients) to mobilising private adaptation finance
Provision(s) in the 2015 Agreement which could help increased mobilisation for adaptation actions

Pieter Pauw (DIE, Netherlands)
Suzanty Sitorus (Indonesia) 
Mizan R. Khan (Bangladesh)

Breakout Group Land sector - Post-2020 land sector reporting and accounting

Focus: Several separate sets of arrangements currently exist for reporting and accounting of anthropogenic GHG emissions and removals from the land sector. These include reporting via GHG inventories under the Convention, reporting and partial accounting for land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) activities under the Kyoto Protocol, and reporting for reduced emissions from deforestation, forest degradation and related activities (REDD+) in developing countries. This session will discuss what a long-term vision for land sector reporting and accounting might look like, and what near-term steps could be taken to get there.

Co-facilitated by Marcelo Rocha (Fábrica Éthica Brasil) and Jim Penman (UCL)

Draft Background document: “Planting the Foundations of a Post-2020 Land Sector Reporting and Accounting Framework” by Gregory Briner and Susanne Konrad

Part 1 -
Aims and possible elements of a long-term vision for land sector reporting and accounting in the post-2020 climate regime
Aspects of the post-2020 land sector reporting and accounting framework which should be agreed at the international level, and which should be nationally-determined
Gregory Briner (OECD)
Paulo Canaveira (Terraprima Serviços Ambientais, Portugal)

Part 2 -
To what extent could existing rules (for GHG reporting under the Convention, LULUCF accounting under the KP and REDD+ for developing countries) be used in the post-2020 climate regime?

Is convergence necessary? If so, to what extent could convergence be achieved?
What type of decisions could feasibly be agreed at COP 20 and COP 21 on land sector reporting and accounting? What would need to be decided later?
Swapan Mehra (Iora Ecological Solutions, India)
Nur Masripatin (Indonesia)

Breakout Group Energy sector transformation and the 2015 agreement

Co-facilitated by Mulugeta Mengist Ayalew (Ethiopia) and Paul Watkinson (France)

Draft Background documents: 
- Case study: long-term energy sector transformation [Chapter 7 in “Options for Streamlining the UNFCCC Process and Enhancing Inter-linkages in the Post-2020 Period” by Gregory Briner, Takayoshi Kato, Susanne Konrad and Christina Hood]
- IEA (2014), Tracking Clean Energy Progress 2014

Part 1: Overview; Technology RD&D 

Decarbonisation of the energy sector is a multi-faceted challenge, linking short and long time horizons and actions inside and outside the UNFCCC process. 

Focus: Key elements of energy sector decarbonisation; Possible role of UNFCCC processes in advancing them. Then, how clean energy technology RD&D could be stimulated by the 2015 agreement.

How can energy sector objectives and institutions be best leveraged to help meet climate goals?
How could processes and institutions inside and outside the UNFCCC best contribute to accelerating RD&D of clean energy technologies?
Philippe Benoit and Christina Hood (IEA)
Gabriel Blanco (UNICEM)
Nicholas Sherman (US)

Part 2: Providing long-term investment signals 

Focus: how the 2015 Agreement could provide public and private energy sector investors with greater long-term confidence, enabling them to shift investments in long-lived assets to be consistent with a 2 °C pathway.

Which elements in the 2015 Agreement are key to influencing investment behaviour in the energy sector?
How could the 2015 Agreement send “investable” long-term signals to the energy sector?

Laura Cozzi (IEA)
Giles Dickson (Alstom)
David Hone (Shell)
Thomas Spencer (IDDRI)

Breakout Group The 2015 Agreement: Streamlining the UNFCCC process and enhancing inter-linkages

Focus: Means of implementation (i.e. finance, technology and capacity building) are all needed to support developing countries to implement mitigation and adaptation actions. This breakout group focused on how the 2015 Agreement could help to streamline and enhance inter-linkages between arrangements and institutions relating to means of implementation.
Facilitated by Farhana Yamin (UCL)
Draft Background document: “Options for Streamlining the UNFCCC Process and Enhancing Inter-linkages in the Post-2020 Period” by Gregory Briner, Takayoshi Kato, Susanne Konrad and Christina Hood

How could the 2015 Agreement help to streamline the arrangements and institutions for finance, technology and capacity building?
How could greater co-ordination and stronger inter-linkages be forged among and between arrangements and institutions relating to finance, technology and capacity building?

Takayoshi Kato (OECD)
Yvonne Elizabeth Chee (Singapore)

Closing Plenary: Next steps

Focus: Reflections on the discussions in breakout groups and implications for future CCXG work

by Tomasz Chruszczow (Poland)

Co-facilitators Summaries/Key points of breakout groups and discussions

  • Adaptation finance co-facilitated by I. Gnittke and I. Cavelier Adarve
  • Energy sector transition and the 2015 agreement co-facilitated by P. Watkinson and M. Mengist Ayalew
  • Role of 2015 agreement in mobilising climate finance co-facilitated by G. Arias and A. Hilber
  • Streamlining the UNFCCC Process and Enhancing Inter-linkages facilitated by F. Yamin
  • Post-2020 land sector reporting and accounting co-facilitated by M. Rocha and J. Penman

 

 

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