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Climate change

Global Forum on the Environment and Climate Change - organised by the Climate Change Expert Group (CCXG) - March 2017

 

The CCXG Global Forum on the Environment and Climate Change was held on 14-15 March 2017 at the OECD Conference Centre in Paris.  This Forum brought together approximately 200 delegates from a wide range of developed and developing countries, as well as representatives from business, inter-governmental organisations, research organisations, environmental NGOs and other relevant institutions. Two sessions of the Forum were organised in partnership with the International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD). The issues discussed included the 2018 facilitative dialogue, tracking adaptation progress, clarity, transparency and understanding of mitigation contributions, as well as long-term strategies for mitigation and adaptation.

The Forum provided a neutral space outside of the UNFCCC negotiations for participants to develop a shared understanding of the transparency-related provisions in the Paris Agreement and how these might be implemented. The Forum was also an opportunity for delegates to have an objective discussion of the priorities and timeline for related work to be undertaken by the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Paris Agreement and other subsidiary bodies under the UNFCCC.

summaries of breakout GROUPS

 

Agenda, presentations and final list of participants

  • List of participants

 

DAY 1 -  Tuesday 14 March 2017

9:30 – 09:45 Welcoming remarks

Chair: Jacob Werksman
Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

9:45 – 10:30 Opening Plenary : Setting the scene

The Paris Agreement has set ambitious long-term goals related to mitigation, adaptation and finance. To ground discussions throughout the CCXG Global Forum, this opening session provided an overview of the current global mitigation and adaptation trends as well as future potential.

Discussion questions:  

  1. What are some of the key trends in terms of mitigation and adaptation? 
  2. What key priority areas should 2017 and 2018 focus on to achieve progress in implementation of the Paris Agreement?

 

10:30 – 11:15 Plenary: The 2018 facilitative dialogue

Facilitator: Jacob Werksman

The Conference of the Parties, by decision 1/CP.21, decided to “convene a facilitative dialogue among Parties in 2018 to take stock of the collective efforts of Parties in relation to progress towards the long-term goal referred to in Article 4.1 of the Agreement and to inform the preparation of NDCs pursuant to Article 4.8 of the Agreement”. This session explored different possible priorities for the 2018 facilitative dialogue.

  • "Information needs for the 2018 facilitative dialogue: options and issues", Ellis, J. and M. Vaidyula (2017, draft)  
  • Andrès Mogro, Ecuador
  • Przemyslaw Sobanski, Poland
  • Kaveh Guilanpour, Marshall Islands

Discussion question:

  1. What are your three priorities for the outputs/outcomes of the 2018 facilitative dialogue?”

 

11:45 – 13:15 Breakout Group 1: 2018 facilitative dialogue: information needed to take stock for collective mitigation efforts under Article 4.1 

Co-facilitators: Gilberto Arias, Energeia and Henrik Hallgrim Eriksen, Norway

One of the two main objectives of the 2018 facilitative dialogue is to take stock of the collective efforts of Parties with respect to progress towards long-term goals established in Article 4.1. This session discussed what relevant information would be required to take stock of these collective efforts and the potential challenges in gathering such information.

  • "Information needs for the 2018 facilitative dialogue: options and issues", Ellis, J. and M. Vaidyula (2017, draft)

Discussion questions:

  1. What information is needed to take stock of collective mitigation efforts and outcomes in the short, medium and long-term?
  2. What are the challenges associated with gathering this information in the context of the facilitative dialogue?

     

    11:45 – 13:15 Breakout Group A: Tracking national progress in adaptation

    Co-facilitators: Timo Leiter, GIZ and Andrea Meza, Costa Rica 

    Setting up monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems allows countries to track the progress they make in implementing adaptation measures and policies, as well as their effectiveness in reducing climate risks. This session highlighted experiences in designing and implementing national M&E systems, including why countries may benefit from setting up such a system, and whose needs these systems could cater to.

    • “Insights from national adaptation monitoring and evaluation systems", Vallejo, L. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1. What would be the key benefits of a fully operational national adaptation M&E system, and who could benefit from it?
    2. How could the national adaptation M&E systems be tailored to reach and benefit the key target audiences?

     

    14:30 – 16:00 Breakout Group 2: Potential role(s)of the 2018 facilitative dialogue in informing NDCs

    Co-facilitators: Gilberto Arias, Energeia and  Henrik Hallgrim Eriksen, Norway 

    A second main objective of the 2018 facilitative dialogue is to inform the preparation of NDCs. This session explored the ways in which the FD2018 could play a helpful role in informing the preparation of NDCs as well as in supporting Parties’ efforts in progressing towards Article 4.1 objectives.

    • “Information needs for the 2018 facilitative dialogue: options and issues”, Ellis, J. and M. Vaidyula (2017, draft) 

    Discussion questions:

    1. What kind of collective assessment would be of most use to Parties to inform their NDCs?
    2. In what other ways could the facilitative dialogue support Parties in progressing towards the objectives in Article 4.1 of the Paris Agreement?

     

    14:30 – 16:00 Breakout Group B: Tracking national progress in adaptation

    Co-facilitators: Timo Leiter, GIZ and Andrea Meza, Costa Rica

    Many countries have indicated in their Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) their interest in developing a monitoring and evaluation system for adaptation. However, many such systems are only at the planning stage. This session sought to identify lessons learned from existing approaches which might benefit other countries, and where the key gaps still lie.

    • “Insights from national adaptation monitoring and evaluation systems", Vallejo, L. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1. What specific challenges (apart from resource constraints) do you foresee or have you experienced in relation to setting up or implementing adaptation monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems at the national level?
    2. What lessons learnt from designing or implementing adaptation M&E systems could benefit other countries looking to develop their own system?

     

    16:30 – 18:00 Plenary: Strategies for long-term low greenhouse gas emission development and enhancing climate resilience 

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

    The Paris Agreement encourages all countries to formulate long-term low GHG emission development strategies and decision 1/CP.21 invites Parties to communicate these by 2020. Some countries have developed such strategies, while many others are in the process of doing so. This session aimed to share findings from long-term strategies and pathways, highlighting where these identify opportunities for both immediate and longer-term action, and how they can assist Parties in developing (and revising) their NDCs.

    Discussion questions:

    1. What information is needed for developing successful long-term low carbon and climate-resilient strategies?
    2. How can establishing long-term strategies help inform and update NDCs and other actions with long term benefits?   

       

    DAY 2 -  Wednesday 15 March 2017

    9:00 – 10:30 Breakout Group 3: Experience with communicating mitigation NDCs 

    Co-facilitators: Kelly Levine, WRI and Santosh Manivannan, Singapore

    The vast majority of countries have submitted nationally determined contributions with a mitigation component. Examining these NDCs can give insight into what further guidance could help Parties communicate future mitigation NDCs in a manner that facilitates clarity, transparency and understanding. Speakers and participants were invited to share their experiences with communicating the mitigation component of their NDCs, and any lessons they have drawn from these experiences relevant to developing further guidance.

    Discussion questions:

    1.  

      In communicating NDCs, which information elements were the most challenging to provide and how does this change with greater experience? 
    2. Was the guidance provided to communicate INDCs useful (1/CP.20, paragraph 14)? What, specifically, was helpful and/or unhelpful about it?

     

    9:00 –10:30 Breakout Group C: Information needed to identify progress towards the global goal on adaptation, organised in partnership with ICCCAD

    Co-facilitators: Saleemlul Huq, ICCCAD and Anne Olhoff, UNEP

    Article 14 of the Paris Agreement states that the COP shall periodically take stock of the collective progress towards achieving the long-term goals, including on adaptation. Article 7.14 outlines four components to this stocktake: recognising efforts of developing countries, enhancing the implementation of adaptation and reviewing adequacy & effectiveness of adaptation and support, as well as the overall progress towards the global goal. This session focused on what information is needed to address each of these four components.

    Discussion questions:

    1.  

      What key aspects would need to be addressed to assess progress towards the four adaptation components of the global stocktake? 
    2. What information would be needed and how could it contribute to the enhancement of Parties’ actions and support on adaptation?

     

    11:00 –12:30 Breakout Group 4Developing guidance on information for CTU under the Paris Agreement

    Co-facilitators: Kelly Levine, WRI and Santosh Manivannan, Singapore

    At COP22, Parties agreed to take forward outcomes of work programmes under decision 1/CP.21; this includes work to develop guidance for facilitating the clarity, transparency and understanding (CTU) of NDCs, as per Article 4.8. In this session, speakers and participants were invited to discuss what elements could shape this guidance, with an emphasis on how the purpose of the guidance may structure its content, and on links between the guidance on CTU and other guidance with relevance to NDCs. 

    • “Information needed to facilitate the clarity, transparency and understanding of mitigation contributions”, Moarif, S. (2017, draft)

    Discussion questions:

    1. What are the different purposes of CTU, and what do these different purposes imply for communication of information alongside NDCs? 
    2. What are the links between guidance on CTU and other guidance under the Paris Agreement that will also influence the CTU of NDCs, such as on accounting and reporting of progress?

     

    11:00 –12:30 Breakout Group DThe role of adaptation-related reports in assessing collective progress towards the long-term global goal on adaptation, organised in partnership with ICCCAD

    Co-facilitators: Saleemlul Huq, ICCCAD and Anne Olhoff, UNEP 

    In addition to the existing reporting requirements on adaptation under the UNFCCC, all Parties are requested to submit periodically, as appropriate, an adaptation communication as per the Article 7.10 of the Paris Agreement. Following Breakout Group C aiming to clarify the information needed for each of the adaptation components of the global stocktake, this session focused on the extent to which these information needs could be met by national reporting, and how potential information gaps could be filled.

    Discussion questions:

    1.  

      What role could national reporting play in assessing collective progress, and where are the main gaps in reporting?
    2. What additional information is needed and where could it come from?

     

    14:00 – 14:30 Information session: Update from the APA co-chairs 

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group 

    In this session, the APA co-chairs shared updates from recent climate negotiations and insights on next steps in 2017 and 2018.

    • Sarah Baashan, APA Co-chair
    • Jo Tyndall, APA Co-chair

     

    14:30 – 15:45 Information sessionFinancing long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies and enhancing climate resilience 

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

    Article 4.19 calls for Parties to strive “to formulate and communicate long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies”. Additional levels of finance may be required to implement such long-term strategies for both mitigation and adaptation action. This session explored options for financing the implementation of national mitigation and adaptation strategies, the challenges met in funding the implementation of these strategies and how to overcome them.

    Discussion questions:

    1. How is the implementation of national long-term strategies for mitigation and adaptation being financed?
    2. What are the major challenges faced in financing the implementation of those strategies, and how can they be overcome?

     

    16:15 – 17:00 Plenary: Co-facilitators’ key takeaways from breakout groups

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

    In this session, the facilitators shared their three key takeaways from each breakout group discussion, allowing participants to gain insights from sessions they were unable to attend.

     

    17:00 – 17:30 Closing Plenary: Reflections on next steps in 2017 and 2018 

    Facilitator: Jacob Werksman, Chair of the Climate Change Expert Group

    In this session, representatives from the COP22 and COP23 presidencies shared insights on next steps and priorities during 2017 and 2018. 

    • H.E. Aziz Mekouar, Morocco
    • H.E. Deo Saran, Fiji

     

     

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