By Date


  • 28-April-2016

    English

    SME Policy Index: Western Balkans and Turkey 2016 - Assessing the Implementation of the Small Business Act for Europe

    The SME Policy Index is a benchmarking tool designed for emerging economies to assess SME policy frameworks and monitor progress in policy implementation over time. The Index has been developed by the OECD in partnership with the European Commission (EC), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), and the European Training Foundation (ETF) in 2006 for the Western Balkans. The South East European Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning (SEECEL) joined as an additional partner in 2014. The SME Policy Index has since 2006 been applied in four regions and nine assessment rounds overall.

    The SME Policy Index: Western Balkans and Turkey 2016 presents the results of the fourth assessment of the Small Business Act for Europe in the Western Balkans and, since 2012, Turkey. The assessment framework is structured around the ten principles of the Small Business Act for Europe (SBA). It provides a wide-range of pro-enterprise measures to guide the design and implementation of SME policies based on good practices promoted by the EU and the OECD.

    The Index identifies strengths and weaknesses in policy design, implementation and monitoring. It allows for comparison across countries and measures convergence towards good practices and relevant policy standards. It aims to support governments in setting targets for SME policy development and to identify strategic priorities to further improve the business environment. It also helps to engage governments in policy dialogue and exchange good practices within the region and with OECD and EU members.

  • 27-April-2016

    English

    The Ocean Economy in 2030

    This report explores the growth prospects for the ocean economy, its capacity for future employment creation and innovation, and its role in addressing global challenges. Special attention is devoted to the emerging ocean-based industries in light of their high growth and innovation potential, and contribution to addressing challenges such as energy security, environment, climate change and food security.
     
    The report examines the risks and uncertainties surrounding the future development of ocean industries, the innovations required in science and technology to support their progress, their potential contribution to green growth and some of the implications for ocean management.  Finally, and looking across the future ocean economy as a whole, it explores possible avenues for action that could boost its long-term development prospects while managing the use of the ocean itself in responsible, sustainable ways.

     

  • 26-April-2016

    English

    Multiplication of Environmental Labelling and Information Schemes (ELIS): Implications for Environment and Trade - Environment Working Paper

    This report explores potential effects of the recent rapid growth in Environmental Labelling Information Schemes (ELIS) around the world, with a focus on the implications of ELIS multiplication for environmental effectiveness and international trade.

    Related Documents
  • 25-April-2016

    English

    Is there ever a right time for climate action?

    During most of the roughly three decades since climate change became a global concern, governments optimistically assumed that a green transition would happen naturally over time, as rising fossil-fuel prices nudged consumers toward low-carbon alternatives. But today, with fuel prices so low, what can be done to change consumption patterns?

    Related Documents
  • 25-April-2016

    English

    Renewable energy: Catalyst for a clean energy transition

    The Paris Agreement is an unprecedented achievement in the fight against climate change. A record number of countries came together, first in the French capital for the COP21 conference in November-December 2015 and then formally to sign the agreement at the UN on 22 April 2016, to ensure that future generations enjoy a stable, healthy and habitable world.

    Related Documents
  • 23-April-2016

    English

    A Review of Public Policies relating to the Use of Environmental Labelling and Information Schemes (ELIS) - Environment Working Paper

    This report provides a brief review of how national government policies and guidelines apply to or regulate the use of environmental labelling and information schemes (ELIS) in selected OECD countries. The report reviews definitions relevant to environmental claims and identifies four types of potentially false or misleading environmental claims.

    Related Documents
  • 20-April-2016

    English

    Webinar: Green Growth, Indicators, and the SDGs

    Join the Green Growth Knowledge Platform (GGKP) for a webinar on 20 April from 16:00-17:30 (Geneva time), to debate where and how the way we measure our progress towards an inclusive green economy, including how this relates to the SDGs can be improved.

    Related Documents
  • 20-April-2016

    English

    Post Paris, should we be going for CCCS = Compulsory Carbon Capture and Storage? Insights Blog

    Clearly a revolution in the global economy is needed for a heavy reduction of GHG emissions. You may have heard of Carbon Capture and Storage or CCS. This technology prevents CO2 from fossil fuel combustion from accumulating in the atmosphere.

    Related Documents
  • 19-April-2016

    English

    Spatial Planning INstruments and the Environment (SPINE)

    This work consists of a series of spatially explicit empirical analyses of the relationships between land use patterns, socioeconomic outcomes, environmental pressures, and the use of specific policy instruments.

    Related Documents
  • 16-April-2016

    English

    Sustainable Materials Management (SMM)

    The OECD Environmental Strategy clearly outlines the need for governments to look for integrated solutions such as sustainable materials management to address current environmental concerns. Ideally public authorities should try to internalise all negative environmental externalities in the prices facing firms and consumers at all stages of the life-cycle.

    Related Documents
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 > >>