By Date


  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Test No. 240: Medaka Extended One Generation Reproduction Test (MEOGRT)

    This Test Guideline describes the Medaka Extended One Generation Test (MEOGRT), which exposes fish over multiple generations to give data relevant to ecological hazard and risk assessment of chemicals, including suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).  Exposure in the MEOGRT starts with spawning fish (P or F0 generation) and continues until hatching (until two weeks post fertilization, wpf) in the second (F2) generation. This Test Guideline measures several biological endpoints.  Primary emphasis is given to potential adverse effects on population relevant parameters including survival, gross development, growth and reproduction (fecundity).  Secondarily, in order to provide mechanistic information and provide linkage between results from other kinds of field and laboratory studies, where there is a posteriori evidence for a chemical having potential endocrine disrupter activity (e.g. androgenic or oestrogenic activity in other tests and assays) then other useful information is obtained by measuring vitellogenin (vtg) mRNA (or vitellogenin protein, VTG), phenotypic secondary sex characteristics (SSC) as related to genetic sex, and evaluating histopathology.

  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Test No. 490: In Vitro Mammalian Cell Gene Mutation Tests Using the Thymidine Kinase Gene

    The in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test can be used to detect gene mutations induced by chemical substances. This TG includes two distinct in vitro mammalian gene mutation assays requiring two specific tk heterozygous cells lines: L5178Y tk+/-3.7.2C cells for the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and TK6 tk+/- cells for the TK6 assay. Genetic events detected using the tk locus include both gene mutations and chromosomal events.

    Cells in suspension or monolayer culture are exposed to, at least four analysable concentrations of the test substance, both with and without metabolic activation, for a suitable period of time. They are subcultured to determine cytotoxicity and to allow phenotypic expression prior to mutant selection. Cytotoxicity is usually determined by measuring the relative cloning efficiency (survival) or relative total growth of the cultures after the treatment period. The treated cultures are maintained in growth medium for a sufficient period of time, characteristic of each selected locus and cell type, to allow near-optimal phenotypic expression of induced mutations. Mutant frequency is determined by seeding known numbers of cells in medium containing the selective agent to detect mutant cells, and in medium without selective agent to determine the cloning efficiency (viability). After a suitable incubation time, colonies are counted.

  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Test No. 483: Mammalian Spermatogonial Chromosomal Aberration Test

    This test measures structural chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome- and chromatid-type) in dividing spermatogonial germ cells and is, therefore, expected to be predictive of induction of heritable mutations in these germ cells. The purpose of the in vivo mammalian spermatogonial chromosomal aberration test is to identify those chemicals that cause structural chromosomal aberrations in mammalian spermatogonial cells (1) (2) (3). In addition, this test is relevant to assessing genetoxicity because, although they may vary among species, factors of in vivo metabolism, pharmacokinetics and DNA-repair processes are active and contribute to the response.

    The original Test Guideline 483 was adopted in 1997. This modified version of the Test Guideline reflects many years of experience with this assay and the potential for integrating or combining this test with other toxicity or genotoxicity studies.

  • 27-July-2015

    English

    Towards Green Growth? - Tracking Progress

    The 2011 Green Growth Strategy provided initial guidance to governments on how to achieve economic growth and development, while preventing costly environmental damage and inefficient resource use. What progress have countries made in aligning economic and environmental priorities since 2011? This report attempts to evaluate this progress and highlight where there is broad scope to heighten the ambition and effectiveness of green growth policy. It draws lessons from green growth mainstreaming across the OECD’s work programme, notably in terms of how governments can maximise institutional settings to seize economic opportunities surrounding the transition to a green economy, and considers ways to enrich the Green Growth Strategy based on work undertaken since its launch.

  • 27-July-2015

    English

    Webinar: Towards Green Growth? Official Launch of the OECD's Tracking Progress Report

    On July 27, 2015 from 15:00 to 16:30 Paris time, the Green Growth Knowledge Platform (GGKP) hosted a webinar to launch the OECD's new report titled "Towards Green Growth? Tracking Progress". Featuring Carlo Carraro, Catherine L. Mann, Nathalie Girouard and Kevin Urama; this webinar will explore the advances made since the launch of the OECD's green growth strategy in 2011.

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  • 16-July-2015

    English

    Green and Growing, or ripe and rotting? Insights Blog

    In a recent lecture on climate change, the Secretary-General stated that “Tomorrow’s societies engineered around yesterday’s solutions won’t get us there.” The OECD’s work on green growth is just one example of where the organisation is working towards the development of solutions for today.

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  • 13-July-2015

    English

    Innovation, Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability in Brazil

    Agriculture and the agro-processing sector in Brazil have shown impressive growth over the past two decades. This has largely been driven by productivity improvements and structural adjustment resulting from broad economic reforms, as well as new technologies developed by agricultural science. Government policy and industry initiatives are increasingly focused on the sustainability of agricultural development.

  • 7-July-2015

    English

    Climate Change Risks and Adaptation - Linking Policy and Economics

    Climate change is giving rise to diverse risks, ranging from changing incidences of tropical diseases to increased risks of drought, varying widely in their potential severity, frequency and predictability. Governments must integrate the management of these climate risks into policy making if they are to successfully adapt to a changing climate. Economic analysis has a vital role to play in supporting these efforts, by identifying costs and benefits and supporting decision-making for an uncertain future. However, this analysis needs to be adapted to the institutions, policies and climate risks in a given country. Building on the experience of OECD countries, this report sets out how the latest economic evidence and tools can enable better policy making for adaptation.

  • 3-July-2015

    English

    Climate: What’s changed, what hasn’t and what we can do about it - Six Months to COP21

    Without zero net CO2 emissions, temperatures will just keep rising. When I said that two years ago, it was deemed controversial. Today, I’m pleased to see that it has become conventional wisdom and a commonly shared goal – including just last month by the G7 Leaders.

  • 3-July-2015

    English

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