Latest Documents


  • 30-November-2015

    English, PDF, 2,310kb

    The FASTER Principles for Successful Carbon Pricing: An approach based on initial experience

    This report outlines principles for successful carbon pricing, based on economic principles and experience of what is already working around the world. It is intended to provide a foundation for designing efficient, and cost-effective carbon pricing instruments—primarily explicit carbon taxes and emissions trading systems—at the national and sub-national level.

  • 23-September-2015

    English

    Monetary Carbon Values in Policy Appraisal: An Overview of Current Practice and Key Issues - Environment Working Paper

    Cost-benefit analyses and other quantitative appraisals are used in many countries to support decision-making in public policy, including investment projects in sectors such as transport and energy. This paper discusses the range of approaches which can be employed to value changes in carbon emissions in policy appraisalsand presents some case studies and a survey of current practice in OECD countries.

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  • 1-July-2015

    English

    6th ITD Global Conference

    The International Tax Dialogue (ITD) is organising its 6th global conference at the OECD. This year’s conference will focus on Tax and the Environment, an issue of growing importance and of direct relevance in the lead up to the COP21 meeting taking place later in the year. The ITD is a joint initiative of the EC, IDB, IMF, OECD, World Bank and CIAT.

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  • 25-June-2015

    English

    Taxing Energy Use 2015 - OECD and Selected Partner Economies

    Energy is a critical input into the production and consumption patterns that support economic and social wellbeing. However, many forms of energy use contribute to the environmental and climate challenges societies face today. Taxation is a key tool by which governments can influence energy use to contain its environmental impacts. This report provides a systematic analysis of the structure and level of energy taxes in OECD and selected other countries; together, they cover 80% of global energy use.

    This report builds on the 2013 edition of Taxing Energy Use, expanding the geographic coverage of the 2013 data set to include Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russia and South Africa. The report describes energy use, taxation and pricing in these countries and presents detailed graphical profiles of the structure of energy use and taxation for each.

    The analysis reveals large differences in the taxation of energy across countries, although common patterns emerge. Transport taxes are considerably higher than in other sectors, where fuels that cause considerable harm for the environment and human health are often taxed at very low – or zero – rates. With few exceptions, countries' energy taxes do not harness the full power of taxes to reduce pollution and combat climate change.

  • 22-June-2015

    English

    Competitiveness Impacts of the German Electricity Tax - Environment Working Paper

    Proposals to increase environmentally related taxes are often challenged on competitiveness grounds. The concern is that value creation in certain sectors might decline domestically if a country introduces environmentally related taxes unilaterally. This paper provides evidence on the short-term competitiveness impacts of the German electricity tax introduced unilaterally in 1999.

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  • 14-April-2015

    English

    Impacts of Carbon Prices on Indicators of Competitiveness: A Review of Empirical findings - Environment Working Paper

    Concerns around potential losses of competitiveness as a result of unilateral action on carbon pricing are often central for policy makers contemplating the introduction of such instruments. This paper is a review of literature on ex post empirical evaluations of the impacts of carbon prices on indicators of competitiveness as employed in the literature, including employment, output or exports, at different levels of aggregation.

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  • 2-October-2014

    English

    Tax Preferences for Environmental Goals: Use, Limitations and Preferred Practices

    This paper reviews the use of tax preferences to achieve environmental policy objectives. Tax preferences involve using the tax system to adjust relative prices with a view to influencing producer or consumer behaviour in favour of goods or services that are considered to be environmentally beneficial.

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  • 2-October-2014

    English

    Environmental and Related Social Costs of the Tax Treatment of Company Cars and Commuting Expenses

    This paper builds upon a recent OECD paper on the personal tax treatment of company cars and commuting expenses in OECD member-countries and aims to arrive at a better understanding of the environmental and related social costs of the tax treatment described therein.

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  • 30-September-2014

    English

    Tax benefits from company cars

    Company cars form a large proportion of the car fleet in many countries and are influential in determining the composition of the wider vehicle fleet. When employees provided with a company car use it for personal purposes, personal income tax rules value the benefit in a number of different ways. How accurate these rules are in valuing the benefit has important implications for tax revenue, the environment and other social impacts.

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  • 21-May-2014

    English

    The Cost of Air Pollution - Health Impacts of Road Transport

    Outdoor air pollution kills more than 3 million people across the world every year, and causes health problems from asthma to heart disease for many more. This is costing societies very large amounts in terms of the value of lives lost and ill health. Based on extensive new epidemiological evidence since the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study, and OECD estimates of the Value of Statistical Life, this report provides evidence on the health impacts from air pollution and the related economic costs.

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