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  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Test No. 476: In Vitro Mammalian Cell Gene Mutation Tests using the Hprt and xprt genes

    The in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test can be used to detect gene mutations induced by chemical substances. In this test, the used genetic endpoints measure mutation at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), and at a transgene of xanthineguanine phosphoribosyl transferase (XPRT). The HPRT and XPRT mutation tests detect different spectra of genetic events.

    Cells in suspension or monolayer culture are exposed to, at least four analysable concentrations of the test substance, both with and without metabolic activation, for a suitable period of time. They are subcultured to determine cytotoxicity and to allow phenotypic expression prior to mutant selection. Cytotoxicity is usually determined by measuring the relative cloning efficiency (survival) or relative total growth of the cultures after the treatment period. The treated cultures are maintained in growth medium for a sufficient period of time, characteristic of each selected locus and cell type, to allow near-optimal phenotypic expression of induced mutations. Mutant frequency is determined by seeding known numbers of cells in medium containing the selective agent to detect mutant cells, and in medium without selective agent to determine the cloning efficiency (viability). After a suitable incubation time, colonies are counted.

  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Test No. 241: The Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay (LAGDA)

    The test guideline of the Larval Amphibian Growth and Development Assay (LAGDA) describes a toxicity test with an amphibian species (African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis)) that considers growth and development from fertilization through the early juvenile period.  It is an assay (typically 16 weeks) that assesses early development, metamorphosis, survival, growth, and partial reproductive maturation. It also enables measurement of a suite of other endpoints that allows for diagnostic evaluation of suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) or other types of developmental and reproductive toxicants. The LAGDA serves as a higher tier test with an amphibian for collecting more comprehensive concentration-response information on adverse effects suitable for use in hazard identification and characterization, and in ecological risk assessment. The general experimental design entails exposing X. laevis embryos at Nieuwkoop and Faber (NF) stage 8-10 (3) to a minimum of four different concentrations of test chemical and control(s) until 10 weeks after the median time to NF stage 62.  There are four replicates in each test concentration with eight replicates for the control. Endpoints evaluated during the course of the exposure (at the interim sub-sample and final sample at completion of the test) include those indicative of generalized toxicity: mortality, abnormal behaviour, and growth determinations (length and weight), as well as endpoints designed to characterize specific endocrine toxicity modes of action targeting oestrogen, androgen or thyroid-mediated physiological processes.

  • 28-July-2015

    English

    Test No. 422: Combined Repeated Dose Toxicity Study with the Reproduction/Developmental Toxicity Screening Test

    This screening Test Guideline describes the effects of a test chemical on male and female reproductive performance. It has been updated with endocrine disruptor endpoints, in particular measure of anogenital distance and male nipple retention in pups and thyroid examination.

    The test substance is administered in graduated doses to several groups of males and females. Males should be dosed for a minimum of four weeks. Females should be dosed throughout the study, so approximately 63 days. Matings "one male to one female" should normally be used in this study. This Test Guideline is designed for use with the rat. It is recommended that each group be started with at least 10 animals of each sex. Generally, at least three test groups and a control group should be used. Dose levels may be based on information from acute toxicity tests or on results from repeated dose studies. The test substance is administered orally and daily. The results of this study include clinical observations, body weight and food/water consumption, oestrous cycle monitoring, offspring parameters observation/measurement, thyroid hormone measurement, as well as gross necropsy and histopathology. The findings of this toxicity study should be evaluated in terms of the observed effects, necropsy and microscopic findings. Because of the short period of treatment of the male, the histopathology of the testis and epididymus should be considered along with the fertility data, when assessing male reproductive effects.

  • 27-July-2015

    English

    Towards Green Growth? - Tracking Progress

    The 2011 Green Growth Strategy provided initial guidance to governments on how to achieve economic growth and development, while preventing costly environmental damage and inefficient resource use. What progress have countries made in aligning economic and environmental priorities since 2011? This report attempts to evaluate this progress and highlight where there is broad scope to heighten the ambition and effectiveness of green growth policy. It draws lessons from green growth mainstreaming across the OECD’s work programme, notably in terms of how governments can maximise institutional settings to seize economic opportunities surrounding the transition to a green economy, and considers ways to enrich the Green Growth Strategy based on work undertaken since its launch.

  • 23-July-2015

    English

    Biological pesticides

    The programme (or BioPesticides including microbials - bacteria, algae, protozoa viruses, fungi -, pheromones and semiochemicals, macrobials/invertebrates such as insects and nematodes, and plant extracts/botanicals) helps member countries to harmonise the methods and approaches used to assess biological pesticides.

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  • 16-July-2015

    English

    The OECD QSAR Toolbox

    The Toolbox is a software application intended to the use of governments, chemical industry and other stakeholders in filling gaps in (eco)toxicity data needed for assessing the hazards of chemicals.

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  • 7-July-2015

    English

    Climate Change Risks and Adaptation - Linking Policy and Economics

    Climate change is giving rise to diverse risks, ranging from changing incidences of tropical diseases to increased risks of drought, varying widely in their potential severity, frequency and predictability. Governments must integrate the management of these climate risks into policy making if they are to successfully adapt to a changing climate. Economic analysis has a vital role to play in supporting these efforts, by identifying costs and benefits and supporting decision-making for an uncertain future. However, this analysis needs to be adapted to the institutions, policies and climate risks in a given country. Building on the experience of OECD countries, this report sets out how the latest economic evidence and tools can enable better policy making for adaptation.

  • 3-July-2015

    English

    Aligning Policies for a Low-carbon Economy

    This report produced in co-operation with the International Energy Agency (IEA), the International Transport Forum (ITF) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) identifies the misalignments between climate change objectives and policy and regulatory frameworks across a range of policy domains (investment, taxation, innovation and skills, trade, and adaptation) and activities at the heart of climate policy (electricity, urban mobility and rural land use).

    Outside of countries’ core climate policies, many of the regulatory features of today’s economies have been built around the availability of fossil fuels and without any regard for the greenhouse gas emissions stemming from human activities. This report makes a diagnosis of these contradictions and points to means of solving them to support a more effective transition of all countries to a low-carbon economy.

  • 3-July-2015

    English

    Aligning Policies for a Low-carbon Economy

    This major report produced in co-operation with the International Energy Agency (IEA), the International Transport Forum (ITF) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) identifies the misalignments between climate change objectives and policy and regulatory frameworks across a range of policy domains (investment, taxation, innovation and skills, trade, and adaptation) and activities at the heart of climate policy.

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  • 1-July-2015

    English

    6th ITD Global Conference

    The International Tax Dialogue (ITD) is organising its 6th global conference at the OECD. This year’s conference will focus on Tax and the Environment, an issue of growing importance and of direct relevance in the lead up to the COP21 meeting taking place later in the year. The ITD is a joint initiative of the EC, IDB, IMF, OECD, World Bank and CIAT.

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