By Date


  • 9-October-2017

    English

    Test No. 442E: In Vitro Skin Sensitisation - In Vitro Skin Sensitisation assays addressing the Key Event on activation of dendritic cells on the Adverse Outcome Pathway for Skin Sensitisation

    The present Key Event based Test Guideline (TG) addresses the human health hazard endpoint skin sensitisation, following exposure to a test chemical. More specifically, it addresses the activation of dendritic cells, which is one Key Event on the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) for Skin Sensitisation. Skin sensitisation refers to an allergic response following skin contact with the tested chemical, as defined by the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (UN GHS). This TG provides three in vitro test methods addressing the same Key Event on the AOP: (i) the human cell Line Activation Test or h-CLAT method, (ii) the U937 Cell Line Activation Test or U-SENS and (iii) the Interleukin-8 Reporter Gene Assay or IL-8 Luc assay. All of them are used for supporting the discrimination between skin sensitisers and non-sensitisers in accordance with the UN GHS. Test methods described in this TG either quantify the change in the expression of cell surface marker(s) associated with the process of activation of monocytes and DC following exposure to sensitisers (e.g. CD54, CD86) or the changes in IL-8 expression, a cytokine associated with the activation of DC. In the h-CLAT and U-SENS assays, the changes of surface marker expression are measured by flow cytometry following cell staining with fluorochrome-tagged antibodies. In the IL-8 Luc assay, the changes in IL-8 expression are measured indirectly via the activity of a luciferase gene under the control of the IL-8 promoter. The relative fluorescence or luminescence intensity of the treated cells compared to solvent/vehicle control are calculated and used in the prediction model, to support the discrimination between sensitisers and non-sensitisers.

  • 9-October-2017

    English

    Test No. 433: Acute Inhalation Toxicity: Fixed Concentration Procedure

    This method provides information on health hazard likely to arise from short-term exposure to a test chemical by inhalation.

    It is a principle of the method that only moderately toxic concentrations are used so that ‘evident toxicity’, rather than death/moribundity is used as an endpoint, and concentrations that are expected to be lethal are avoided.

    Groups of animals of a single sex are exposed for a short period of time to the test chemical in a stepwise procedure using the appropriate fixed concentrations for vapours, dusts/mists (aerosols) or gases.  Further groups of animals may be tested at higher concentrations in the absence of signs of evident toxicity or mortality at lower concentrations. This procedure continues until the concentration causing evident toxicity or no more than one death/ moribund animal is identified, or when no effects are seen at the highest concentration or when deaths/ moribundity occur at the lowest concentration.  A total of five animals of one sex will normally be used for each concentration level investigated. The results of this study include: measurements (weighing at least weekly) and daily detailed observations, as well as gross necropsy. The method provides information on the hazardous properties and allows the substance to be classified for acute toxicity according to the Globally Harmonised System of classification and labelling of chemicals.

     

  • 9-October-2017

    English

    Test No. 492: Reconstructed human Cornea-like Epithelium (RhCE) test method for identifying chemicals not requiring classification and labelling for eye irritation or serious eye damage

    This Test Guideline describes an in vitro procedure allowing the identification of chemicals (substances and mixtures) not requiring classification and labelling for eye irritation or serious eye damage in accordance with UN GHS. It makes use of reconstructed human cornea-like epithelium (RhCE) which closely mimics the histological, morphological, biochemical and physiological properties of the human corneal epithelium. The test evaluates the ability of a test chemical to induce cytotoxicity in a RhCE tissue construct, as measured by the MTT assay. Coloured chemicals can also be tested by used of an HPLC procedure. RhCE tissue viability following exposure to a test chemical is measured by enzymatic conversion of the vital dye MTT by the viable cells of the tissue into a blue MTT formazan salt that is quantitatively measured after extraction from tissues. The viability of the RhCE tissue is determined in comparison to tissues treated with the negative control substance (% viability), and is then used to predict the eye hazard potential of the test chemical. Chemicals not requiring classification and labelling according to UN GHS are identified as those that do not decrease tissue viability below a defined threshold (i.e., tissue viability > 60%, for UN GHS No Category).

  • 9-October-2017

    English

    Test No. 491: Short Time Exposure In Vitro Test Method for Identifying i) Chemicals Inducing Serious Eye Damage and ii) Chemicals Not Requiring Classification for Eye Irritation or Serious Eye Damage

    This Test Guideline describes a cytotoxicity-based in vitro assay that is performed on a confluent monolayer of Statens Seruminstitut Rabbit Cornea (SIRC) cells, cultured on a 96-well polycarbonate microplate. After five-minute exposure to a test chemical, the cytotoxicity is quantitatively measured as the relative viability of SIRC cells using the MTT assay. Decreased cell viability is used to predict potential adverse effects leading to ocular damage. Cell viability is assessed by the quantitative measurement, after extraction from the cells, of blue formazan salt produced by the living cells by enzymatic conversion of the vital dye MTT, also known as Thiazolyl Blue Tetrazolium Bromide. The obtained cell viability is compared to the solvent control (relative viability) and used to estimate the potential eye hazard of the test chemical. A test chemical is classified as UN GHS Category 1 when both the 5% and 0.05% concentrations result in a cell viability smaller than or equal to (≤) 70%. Conversely, a chemical is predicted as UN GHS No Category when both 5% and 0.05% concentrations result in a cell viability higher than (>) 70%.

  • 9-October-2017

    English

    Test No. 246: Bumblebee, Acute Contact Toxicity Test

    This test guideline is a laboratory test method, designed to assess the acute contact toxicity of pesticides and other chemicals to adult worker bumblebees.

    Adult worker bumblebees are exposed to the test chemical dissolved in an appropriate carrier, by direct application to the dorsal thorax (droplet). The test duration is at least 48 h. Mortality is recorded daily and compared with control values. Results are analysed in order to calculate the LD50 and NOED, if possible, at 24 h & 48 h and furthermore at 72 h & 96 h in case the study is prolonged.

  • 6-October-2017

    English

    Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA)

    Five case studies reviewed in the second review cycle (2016) of the IATA Case Studies Project were published along with a considerations document highlighting the lessons and learnings stemming from the case studies.

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  • 26-September-2017

    English

    Series on Testing and Assessment: publications by number

    This guidance provides an overarching framework on how to apply available tools to assess the bioavailability of metals in the context of ecological risk assessment.

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  • 21-September-2017

    English

    The OECD QSAR Toolbox

    Download and install the QSAR toolbox version 4.1 patch. It provides a fix for installation issues and additional bugs.

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  • 8-September-2017

    English

    Participate in the survey: Guiding Principles for Chemical Accident Prevention, Preparedness and Response

    This short survey aims to gather feedback from a wide range of stakeholders on the OECD Guiding Principles for Chemical Accidents Prevention, Preparedness. The feedback received from this survey will help us making sure the new version is an improvement from the past and that it meets current needs of users.

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  • 28-August-2017

    English

    OECD Council Acts Related to Chemicals

    List of the Council Decisions and Council Recommendations, known collectively as Council Acts, that are relevant to the work of the Chemicals Programme.

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