Articles


  • 25-August-2015

    English

    Countries with skilled workers have less wage inequality

    Countries where skills are less equally distributed tend to have higher wage inequality. Putting skills to better use can help reduce wage inequality, by strengthening the links between workers’ skills, productivity and wages.

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  • 19-August-2015

    English

    Too small to “productively” use skills at work?

    Human capital is key for economic growth. Not only is it linked to aggregate economic performance but also to each individual’s labour market outcomes. However, a skilled population is not enough to achieve high and inclusive growth, as skills need to be put into productive use at work.

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  • 15-July-2015

    English

    Youth Skills day: 15th July 2015

    As the first edition of “Youth Skills day” unfolds, about 40 million youth aged 15-29 in OECD countries are either looking for work or entirely disconnected from the labour market and from education and training.

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Korea's work-life balance policies for sustainable growth

    Of the abundant resources given to mankind, what is the most underused resource of our time? Without a doubt, women!

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Middle-class economics

    In 2014, the US economy added more jobs than in any year since the 1990s. In fact, this longest streak of job growth on record has persisted into 2015. Inflation-adjusted wages are up by 1.4% annually over the last two years, more than twice the pace of the last recovery. But this is still not enough to make up for decades of subpar gains for middle-class families–a challenge shared by many other OECD economies.

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Business brief: We must teach tomorrow’s skills today

    The New Industrial Revolution affects the workforce in several ways. Ongoing innovation in renewable energy, nanotech, biotechnology, and most of all in information and communication technology will change labour markets worldwide. Especially medium-skilled workers run the risk of being replaced by computers doing their job more efficiently.

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Business brief: Nestlé needs YOUth

    At Nestlé, we have a long tradition of recruiting young people directly from schools or universities. We invest in them, build their capabilities and develop their professional career. We do so while embracing diversity of cultures, traditions and opinions.

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  • 4-May-2015

    English

    More and better jobs for an inclusive recovery

    The world is still repairing the damage done to employment prospects and social equality by the crisis. Governments are trying to create not just more jobs, but better jobs. A new OECD framework helps them to define what job quality means and to measure whether their policies are succeeding.

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  • 2-January-2015

    English

    OECD work on Youth

    Giving young people the skills and tools to find a job is not only good for their own prospects and self-esteem, it is also good for economic growth, social cohesion and widespread well-being. That’s why investing in youth must be a policy priority the world over. This page provides an overview of OECD work on the topic of youth.

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  • 31-December-2014

    English

    Project: Building Statistical Evidence to understand Local Labour Market Differentiation and Support more effective Policies

    The main objective of this project is to gather evidence on local labour markets, in particular on skills supply and demand, employment and productivity.

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