Publications & Documents


  • 2-April-2018

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Italy 2017

    Italy needs to take prompt action to bolster growth and improve people’s skills across the country. As our economies adapt to globalisation, technological and demographic change, the demand for new and higher levels of skills increases. Yet Italy is struggling more than other advanced economies to meet these changing demands. Italy has launched a number of ambitious reforms to boost growth. But the reforms need to fully implement to ensure that schools, universities and workplaces equip all Italians with the skills needed for success in the economy and society.The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report makes a number of recommendations that will help sustain this positive momentum including, among others, to:
    • Implement the Alternanza Scuola Lavoro (ASL) by training school principals and teachers to effectively engage employers in the design of work-based learning activities and increase incentives for firms to hire trainees.
    • Expand and improve the quality of professional tertiary education institutions (ITS).
    • Increase overall investment in tertiary education
    • Subsidise training programmes that target low-skilled adults who often face difficulties in accessing such opportunities.
    • Increase public and private investment in skills and improve how they are allocated through monitoring and evaluation.
    • Improve the governance system to ensure that skills polices are aligned and coordinated.
  • 28-March-2018

    English, PDF, 1,568kb

    Policy Brief: Putting a face behind the jobs at risk of automation

    Policy Brief on the Future of Work: Putting faces to the jobs at risk of automation

    Related Documents
  • 19-March-2018

    English

    G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting - Future of Work

    In the context of rapid and massive technological change, closing the gap between “Policy 1.0” and “Technology 4.0” is urgent. The OECD is happy to have contributed a report that underpins the Framework Working Group members’ analysis on the implications of the future of work for growth and inclusiveness.

    Related Documents
  • 14-March-2018

    English

    Korea should speed up job market and social protection reforms to strengthen inclusive growth

    Korea’s economy has progressed rapidly over the past 40 years, catching up with the level of well-being in most OECD countries. It now needs to continue and speed up the reforms of its labour market in order to strengthen its social safety net, create better quality jobs and boost inclusive growth, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 14-March-2018

    English

    Towards Better Social and Employment Security in Korea

    This report on Korea is the fourth country study published in a series of reports looking into how policies connect people with jobs, following reports on Australia, Slovenia and the United Kingdom. It has a special focus on low-income groups, jobseekers and workers, and policies geared towards closing the considerable gaps these groups are facing around income and employment support. In the past forty years, Korea has gone through a remarkable economic transformation and in the past two decades, the country has also put in place a comprehensive social protection system and a strong activation framework. Nevertheless, features of Korea’s labour market, which include very low job tenure, a high degree of duality and a high level of informality, make it difficult for some measures to reach workers and jobseekers. This report concludes that significant additional action will be needed to make income and employment supports more effective and inclusive.  
  • 12-March-2018

    English

    Harmonised Unemployment Rates (HURs), OECD - Updated: March 2018

    OECD unemployment rate stable at 5.5% in January 2018

    Related Documents
  • 12-March-2018

    English

    Harmonised Unemployment Rates (HURs), OECD - Updated: March 2018

    OECD unemployment rate stable at 5.5% in January 2018

    Related Documents
  • 1-March-2018

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Lithuania

    Lithuania has undergone major economic and social change since the early 1990s. Despite an exceptionally deep recession following the global financial crisis, impressive economic growth over the past two decades has narrowed income and productivity gaps relative to comparable countries in the OECD. But Lithuania faces a massive demographic challenge, mostly as a result of large and persistent emigration driven primarily by low wages and poor working conditions. Income inequality is also very high, and households at the bottom of the income distribution have recently benefited very little from the recovery. Major reforms of the labour code, the unemployment insurance system, employment policies and pensions were recently undertaken within the New Social Model to improve labour maket adaptibility and income security. This report provides comprehensive analysis of Lithuania’s policies and practices compared with best practice in the field of labour, social and migration from the OECD countries. It contains several recommendations to tackle key challenges facing Lithuania. This report will be of interest in Lithuania as well as other countries looking to promote a more inclusive economy.
  • 1-March-2018

    English

    Lithuania needs to address its demographic challenge and boost job quality

    Lithuania’s economy has recovered strongly from the global financial crisis, with GDP, wages and employment levels back up to their pre-crisis levels. The country should now focus on tackling the demographic challenge of a fast-declining population and making the job market more inclusive, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 26-February-2018

    English

    Enhancing Competitiveness in Central Asia

    Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan have recorded impressive economic growth rates since 2000, driven mainly by the export of commodities and labour. However, the end of the commodity super-cycle and the recent economic slowdown highlighted the risks inherent in this reliance on minerals exports and remittances, as well as the challenges to be overcome to achieve more stable and inclusive growth. The Central Asian countries have long recognised the importance of enhancing the competitiveness of their economies, diversifying the production structures and improving the resilience to external shocks. This will require ambitious reforms in three areas: governance, connectivity, and business environment. This publication focuses mostly on aspects of the business environment and reflects several years of OECD work with Central Asian countries on access to finance, business internationalisation and skills development. Each of the country case studies presented here is the result of a country-specific project carried out by the OECD, hand-in-hand with the governments of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan.
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>