Publications & Documents


  • 11-October-2017

    English

    Luxembourg: reaping the benefits of a diverse society through better integration of immigrants

    Luxembourg’s large foreign-born population is a pillar of the country’s prosperity: they have brought skills and knowledge to many sectors of the economy.

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  • 11-October-2017

    English

    Luxembourg: harnessing skills for more inclusive growth

    Luxembourg’s workforce is highly skilled, reflecting the concentration in the country of sophisticated firms in the financial sector and other top-end international services.

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  • 10-October-2017

    English

    Harmonised Unemployment Rates (HURs), OECD - Updated: October 2017

    OECD unemployment rate stable at 5.8% in August 2017

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  • 9-October-2017

    English

    Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, October 2017

    OECD CLIs point to stable growth momentum in the OECD area

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  • 7-October-2017

    English

    Legal and social barriers holding back women’s empowerment in Middle East and North Africa

    Women in the Middle East and North Africa are better educated and better skilled than ever, yet legal and social barriers mean the share of them in work is still the lowest in the world. Bringing family and labour laws into line with gender goals would enable more women to enter employment and would make MENA economies more competitive and inclusive, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 7-October-2017

    English

    Women's Economic Empowerment in Selected MENA Countries - The Impact of Legal Frameworks in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia

    This report examines how current legal provisions in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia are impacting women’s ability to fully participate in economic life, both as employees and entrepreneurs. It is based on a comparative analysis of the various rights set out in constitutions, personal status laws, labour laws, in addition to tax and business laws. The report recognises the considerable progress made – in particular in the aftermath of the 2011 uprisings – following the adoption of constitutional and institutional reforms to strengthen women’s status.

    Yet ensuring sufficient opportunities for women remains a challenge in the six countries. The report suggests that this may be due to different factors such as: the existence of certain laws that are gender discriminatory, contradictions between various legal frameworks, lack of enforcement mechanisms, and barriers for women in accessing justice.  Through targeted policies, countries can tackle these challenges, and help unleash women’s potential to boost growth, competitiveness and inclusive social development.

  • 5-October-2017

    English

    Launch of the OECD Skills Strategy for Italy: Diagnostic Report

    In the post-war period, Italy enjoyed high growth by exploiting its decentralised production base and nurturing the technical and vocational skills needed for specialised manufacturing. But over the past fifteen years, Italy’s economic performance has been sluggish and productivity has stagnated. This is partly due to skills challenges.

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  • 5-October-2017

    English

    Italy should continue reforms to improve people’s skills and boost growth

    Full and effective implementation of recent reforms, including the Jobs Act and the Good Schools reform, would help boost growth in Italy by improving people’s skills and ensuring their more effective use across the country, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 5-October-2017

    English

    Government at a Glance

    Government at a Glance provides a dashboard of key indicators to help you analyse international comparisons of public sector performance.

  • 4-October-2017

    English

    The Pursuit of Gender Equality - An Uphill Battle

    Gender inequalities persist in all areas of social and economic life and across countries. Young women in OECD countries generally obtain more years of schooling than young men, but women are less likely than men to engage in paid work. Gaps widen with age, as motherhood typically has marked negative effects on gender pay gaps and career advancement. Women are also less likely to be entrepreneurs, and are underrepresented in private and public leadership positions.

    The 2013 and 2015 OECD Gender Recommendations provide guidance on how to advance gender equality in education, employment, entrepreneurship and public life; this book discusses recent developments in these areas in one overview chapter and 24 short chapters which each include key findings and policy recommendations. Topics include violence against women, gender budgeting, the unequal sharing of unpaid work, labour market outcomes and migration. The book presents a range of indicators illustrating gender gaps. It also discusses recent policy initiatives, such as pay transparency measures to reduce gender wage gaps and policy reform aimed at fathers taking parental leave. Overall, progress has been slow and there is a strong need for further policy action to close gender gaps in education, employment, entrepreneurship and public life.

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