Publications & Documents


  • 28-October-2016

    English

    Connecting People with Jobs: The Labour Market, Activation Policies and Disadvantaged Workers in Slovenia

    Giving people better opportunities to participate actively in the labour market improves well-being. It also helps countries to cope with rapid population ageing by mobilising more fully each country’s potential labour resources. However, weak labour market attachment of some groups in society reflects a range of barriers to working or moving up the jobs ladder. This report on Slovenia is the second country study published in a series of reports looking into how activation policies can encourage greater labour market participation of all groups in society with a special focus on the most disadvantaged. Labour market and activation policies are well developed in Slovenia. However, the global financial crisis hit Slovenia hard and revealed some structural weaknesses in the system, which have contributed to a high level of long-term unemployment and low employment rates for some groups. This report on Slovenia therefore focuses on activation policies to improve labour market outcomes for four groups: long-term unemployed people; low-skilled workers; older workers; and workers who were made or are at risk of becoming displaced. There is room to improve policies through promoting longer working lives and through enabling the Employment Service and related institutions to help more harder-to-place jobseekers back into employment.

  • 27-October-2016

    English

    Labour mobility in the European Union: a need for more recognition of foreign qualifications

    Labour market mobility in the European Union is increasing, but it remains too low to provide sufficient adjustment in the face of diverging labour market developments.

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  • 19-October-2016

    English

    Employment situation, second quarter 2016, OECD

    OECD employment rate increases further to 66.9% in the second quarter of 2016

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  • 12-October-2016

    English

    Mind the gaps: boost early childcare education and care in Costa Rica

    Costa Rican well-being indicators are comparable or even above the OECD average in several dimensions (OECD, 2016a). Nevertheless, gaps with OECD countries are large in two dimensions: labour market participation and education.

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  • 11-October-2016

    English

    Realising and expanding opportunities in the United States

    Measures that enable the acquisition of new skills and reduce mismatches between the demand and supply of existing skills can boost US economic growth and make its benefits more inclusive.

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  • 11-October-2016

    English

    The skills of Polish emigrants – evidence from PIAAC

    Based on the OECD data from the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) this paper sheds light on the skills of migrants.

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  • 11-October-2016

    English

    Harmonised Unemployment Rates (HURs), OECD - Updated: October 2016

    OECD unemployment rate stable at 6.3% in August 2016

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  • 10-October-2016

    English

    Mental Health

    Mental disorders account for one of the largest and fastest growing categories of the burden of disease with which health systems must cope, often accounting for a greater burden than cardiovascular disease and cancer.

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  • 10-October-2016

    English

    Policy seminar: Supporting SME competitiveness reforms in the Eastern Partner Countries (Venice, Italy)

    The seminar focused on the facilitation of SME internationalisation as a key area of SME policy, as well as including a broader discussion of building blocks of successful SME competitiveness reforms, including policy co-ordination, public consultations, and monitoring and evaluation of policies.

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  • 7-October-2016

    English

    Defining “green skills” using data

    New research finds that green jobs use high-level cognitive and interpersonal skills more intensively compared to non-green jobs, and tend to be less routinized. They are also heterogeneous in terms of skill level.

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