Publications & Documents


  • 14-January-2016

    English

    OECD Policy Forum on the Future of Work

    Back-to-back with the 2016 OECD Labour Ministerial meeting, a Policy Forum on the Future of work will take place to discuss how digitisation is shaping the world of work and the implications for skills and labour market policy.

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  • 14-January-2016

    English

    Policy Forum on the Future of Work opening remarks

    Globalisation, demographic trends and technological change are transforming jobs in our economy. The overall organisation of work and the skills needed in the workplace are undergoing profound and rapid changes. It is imperative for us to remain ahead of the curve and to be able to provide the necessary tools for workers, companies and labour markets to adapt to these changes efficiently.

  • 14-January-2016

    English

    Project: Local economic strategies for shrinking and ageing labour markets

    The project will identify the policy levers and instruments that can be helpful in the design of strategies to accompany the transition to older local labour markets, and identify how national policy frameworks can best support these transformations.

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  • 13-January-2016

    English

    Harmonised Unemployment Rates (HURs), OECD - Updated: January 2016

    OECD unemployment rate stable at 6.6% in November 2015

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  • 6-January-2016

    English

    LEED Flash January 2016

    This is the newsletter of the OECD LEED Programme.

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  • 18-December-2015

    English

    Measuring and assessing job quality

    OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers N. 174 - This paper presents the OECD Framework for Measuring and Assessing Job Quality developed jointly by the Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Directorate and the Statistics Directorate of the OECD as part of a broader EU-supported project1 and describes its links to the broader well-being agenda pursued by the OECD.

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  • 17-December-2015

    English

    System of unit labour cost, OECD - Updated: December 2015

    OECD Unit Labour Cost growth slows to 0.3% in the third quarter of 2015

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  • 16-December-2015

    English

    Who are the top 1% earners in Europe?

    This is the first paper that comprehensively documents the profiles of the 1% highest paid employees across 18 European countries. The data come from the largest harmonised source available, an employer-based survey that covers the labour income of 10 million employees, excluding the self-employed.

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  • 16-December-2015

    English

    Unequal access to employment support hurts vulnerable laid-off workers in Sweden

    More equal access to employment services and better co-ordination between the government and social partners could help disadvantaged laid-off workers get back into employment, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 16-December-2015

    English

    Back to Work: Sweden - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is the fourth in a series of reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that Sweden has been relatively successful in minimising the adverse effects of displaced workers, manily due to the longstanding tradition of collaboration between the social partners to share responsibility for restructuring by creating special arrangements and practices that provide help to workers much faster that in other OECD countries. Despite this positive institutional framework, there is room to improve policies targeted to displaced workers as remarkable inequalities still exist in both the Swedish labour market and in the way workers are treated.
     

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