By Date


  • 13-May-2016

    English

    Working Together: Skills and Labour Market Integration of Immigrants and their Children in Sweden

    This review is the first in a new series on the skills and labour market integration of immigrants and their children. With 16% of its population born abroad, Sweden has one of the larger immigrant populations among the European OECD countries. Estimates suggest that about half of the foreign-born population originally came to Sweden as refugees or as the family of refugees and Sweden has been the OECD country that has had by far the largest inflows of asylum seekers relative to its population. In all OECD countries, humanitarian migrants and their families face greater challenges to integrate into the labour market than other groups. It is thus not surprising that immigrant versus native-born differences are larger than elsewhere, which also must be seen in the context of high skills and labour market participation among the native-born. For both genders, employment disparities are particularly pronounced among the low-educated, among whom immigrants are heavily overrepresented. These immigrants face particular challenges related to the paucity of low-skilled jobs in Sweden, and policy needs to acknowledge that their integration pathway tends to be a long one. Against this backdrop, Sweden has highly developed and longstanding integration policies that mainly aim at upskilling immigrants while temporarily lowering the cost of hiring, while other tools that work more strongly with the social partners and the civil society are less well developed and need strengthening.

  • 12-May-2016

    English

    Harmonised Unemployment Rates (HURs), OECD - Updated: May 2016

    OECD unemployment rate down to 6.4% in March 2016

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  • 29-April-2016

    English

    Job quality

    The OECD has developed a new framework for measuring and assessing job quality that considers three dimensions, both important for workers’ well-being and relevant for policy. Together, the three dimensions described below allow for a comprehensive assessment of job quality.

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  • 29-April-2016

    English

    Going going gone? Routine jobs in Global Value Chains

    Analysis relying on a new OECD measure of the routine intensity of occupations shows the extent to which countries differ in the share of employment accounted for by routine jobs. It finds that while technological innovation is always associated with higher employment, ICTs correlates positively with employment in all occupations but not in high-routine jobs. Finally, offshoring need not hurt routine-intensive workers.

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  • 28-April-2016

    English

    Migration in Ireland: challenges, opportunities and policies

    The Irish labour market is exceptionally open to international migration flows, thus making labour supply highly responsive to changes in cyclical conditions. Immigration provides the skills that the Irish economy needs.

  • 19-April-2016

    English

    12th Annual Meeting: Creativity, jobs and local development (Venice, Italy)

    This year the Forum will focus on creativity, jobs and local development. We will examine how localities can support culture and creative industries as a source of knowledge and job creation and how the creative industry can act as a powerful driving force areas such as tourism, urban regeneration, and social inclusion.

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  • 19-April-2016

    English

    Employment situation, fourth quarter 2015, OECD

    OECD employment rate back to pre-crisis levels in fourth quarter of 2015

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  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Harmonised Unemployment Rates (HURs), OECD - Updated: April 2016

    OECD unemployment rate stable at 6.5% in February 2016

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  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Taxing Wages 2016

    This annual flagship publication provides details of taxes paid on wages in OECD countries.  It covers: personal income taxes and employee contributions paid by employees, social security contributions and payroll taxes paid by employers, and cash benefits received by in-work families. It illustrates how these taxes and benefits are calculated in each member country and examines how they have an impact on household incomes. The results also enable quantitative cross-country comparisons of labour cost levels and the overall tax and benefit position of single persons and families on different levels of earnings.
    The publication shows the amounts of taxes and social security contributions levied and cash benefits received for eight different family types, which vary by a combination of household composition and household type.  It also presents: the resulting average and marginal tax rates (that is, the tax burden); the average tax rates (showing the part of gross wage earnings or total labour costs taken in tax and social security contributions, both before and after cash benefits); and the marginal tax rates (showing the part of a small increase of gross earnings or total labour costs that is paid in these levies).

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Employment dynamics, young businesses and allocative efficiency

    In a period of sluggish employment growth and disappointing productivity trends in most OECD countries, the central role played by start-ups and young firms in creating jobs and bringing innovations to market acquires renewed importance in the policy debate.

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