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  • 13-June-2017

    English

    OECD Employment Outlook 2017

    The 2017 edition of the OECD Employment Outlook reviews recent labour market trends and short-term prospects in OECD countries. Chapter 1 presents a comparative scoreboard of labour market performance that encompasses the quantity and quality of employment, as well as the inclusiveness of the labour market. During the past decade, most countries managed to better integrate women and potentially disadvantaged groups into the labour market and improve the quality of the working environment, whereas earnings quality was more or less stable and labour market security worsened. Chapter 2 looks at the resilience of labour markets following the global crisis and shows how both structural reforms and expansionary fiscal policy mitigate the unemployment costs of adverse aggregate shocks. OECD countries generally have avoided an increase in structural unemployment, but not a marked deceleration of wage and productivity growth. Chapter 3 documents the impact of technological progress and globalisation on OECD labour markets over the past two decades. Technology is shown to have been strongly associated with both job polarisation and de-industrialisation. The impact of trade integration is difficult to detect and probably small, although rising imports from China has a small effect in depressing employment in manufacturing. Chapter 4 provides an exceptionally rich portrait of collective bargaining in OECD countries that makes it possible to understand better how national systems differ and the implications of those differences for economic performance.

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  • 13-June-2017

    English

    Launch of the 2017 Employment Outlook

    It is my pleasure to launch the OECD’s 2017 Employment Outlook, our flagship report on key labour market developments and prospects in OECD member countries. I’d like to thank Minister Nahles and Germany’s Federal Ministry of Employment and Social Affairs for hosting this event. Today’s launch is very timely given our High-Level Policy Forum on the new OECD Jobs Strategy here in Berlin.

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  • 10-June-2017

    English

    Skills for jobs dataviz

    Skills for jobs

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  • 7-June-2017

    English

    High-Level Policy Forum on the New OECD Jobs Strategy

    The German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs and the OECD are jointly organising a High-Level Policy Forum on the New Jobs Strategy which will take place on 13 June 2017 in Berlin. The Forum will be hosted by Minister Andrea Nahles together with Secretary-General Angel Gurría.

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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Business brief: Towards an inclusive and competitive labour market for the evolving world of work

    The way businesses operate is rapidly changing. A strong online presence and tailored services are crucially important to their global development. Together with the emergence of the on-demand economy the traditional employment relationship is therefore being replaced by a diversity of more detached, agile and adaptable forms of employment.

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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Japan should do more to help young people take part in the labour market

    Japan should step up efforts to improve young people’s job prospects and reduce the share of 15-29 year-olds who are not in employment, education or training (the “NEETs”), according to a new OECD report.

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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Investing in Youth: Japan

    The present report on Japan is the seventh report in the Investing in Youth series. In three statistical chapters, the report provides an overview of the labour market situation of young people in Japan, presents a portrait of young people who are not in employment, education or training (the NEETs) and analyses the income situation of young people in Japan. Two policy chapters provide recommendations on how Japan can improve the school-to-work transition of disadvantaged young people, and on how employment, social and training programmes can help the NEETs find their way back into education or work.

    Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016).

  • 24-May-2017

    English, PDF, 3,369kb

    Policy Brief on the Future of Work: Basic Income as a Policy Option

    Recent debates of Basic Income proposals shine a useful spotlight on the challenges that traditional forms of income support are increasingly facing, and highlight gaps in social provisions that largely depend on income or employment status. Reforms towards more universal income support would need to be introduced in stages, requiring a parallel debate on how to finance a more equal sharing of the benefits of economic growth.

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  • 19-May-2017

    English

    Why workers matter for a successful new production revolution

    The talk of the town this year has truly been the so-called fourth industrial revolution–and rightly so. Digitalisation causes an increasing interconnectivity of people, production and processes. Combined with the rapid development in artificial intelligence, self-learning machines and robot technology it heralds a new time of revolutionary technological progress.

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  • 18-May-2017

    English

    G20 Labour and Employment Ministers Meeting: Shaping the Future of Work

    Globalisation, demographic trends and technological change are transforming jobs in our economy. 9% of jobs across OECD countries could be automated in the next 15-20 years and a further 25% are at risk of significant change. The risk in emerging economies is even larger. According to recent studies, China and India together account for the largest technically automatable employment potential.

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