By Date


  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Korea's work-life balance policies for sustainable growth

    Of the abundant resources given to mankind, what is the most underused resource of our time? Without a doubt, women!

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Middle-class economics

    In 2014, the US economy added more jobs than in any year since the 1990s. In fact, this longest streak of job growth on record has persisted into 2015. Inflation-adjusted wages are up by 1.4% annually over the last two years, more than twice the pace of the last recovery. But this is still not enough to make up for decades of subpar gains for middle-class families–a challenge shared by many other OECD economies.

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    All on Board - Making Inclusive Growth Happen

    All on Board: Making Inclusive Growth Happen puts forth a new approach to economic growth that goes beyond traditional monetary indicators and includes dimensions that reflect people's well-being. It introduces an analytical framework to assess economic growth based on a measurement of multidimensional living standards. The report also presents win-win policies that can deliver stronger growth and greater inclusiveness in

  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Business brief: We must teach tomorrow’s skills today

    The New Industrial Revolution affects the workforce in several ways. Ongoing innovation in renewable energy, nanotech, biotechnology, and most of all in information and communication technology will change labour markets worldwide. Especially medium-skilled workers run the risk of being replaced by computers doing their job more efficiently.

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Launch of the Skills Outlook 2015

    Skills drive economic growth and can boost social cohesion. With growth increasingly driven by productivity improvements, the future economic and social well-being of OECD countries will depend upon providing our young people with the right skills to succeed in the 21st century job market.

  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Business brief: Nestlé needs YOUth

    At Nestlé, we have a long tradition of recruiting young people directly from schools or universities. We invest in them, build their capabilities and develop their professional career. We do so while embracing diversity of cultures, traditions and opinions.

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Governments must step up efforts to tackle youth unemployment

    More than 35 million young people, aged 16-29, across OECD countries are neither employed nor in education or training (NEET). Overall, young people are twice as likely as prime-age workers to be unemployed. Governments need to do more to give young people a good start to their working lives and help them find work, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 21-May-2015

    English

    In It Together: Why Less Inequality Benefits All

    The gap between rich and poor keeps widening. Growth, if any, has disproportionally benefited higher income groups while lower income households have been left behind. This long-run increase in income inequality not only raises social and political concerns, but also economic ones. It tends to drag down GDP growth, due to the rising distance of the lower 40% from the rest of society. Lower income people have been prevented from

  • 21-May-2015

    English

    Launch of "In It Together - Why Less Inequality Benefits All"

    For years now we have been underlining the toll that inequality takes on people’s lives. And I am proud of the contribution that the OECD has made in recent decades, putting inequality at the heart of the political and economic debate. This report proposes concrete policy solutions to promote opportunities for more inclusive growth.

  • 21-May-2015

    English

    Improving job quality and reducing gender gaps are essential to tackling growing inequality

    Income inequality has reached record highs in most OECD countries and remains at even higher levels in many emerging economies. The richest 10 per cent of the population in the OECD now earn 9.6 times the income of the poorest 10 per cent, up from 7:1 in the 1980s and 9:1 in the 2000s, according to a new OECD report.

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