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  • 4-December-2017

    English

    Italy: no country for young people?

    Years after the start of the recession the situation of youth in the Italian labour market remains quite bleak. Nearly one in four young people in Italy are neither in employment, education, or training (NEETs) and many young people lack the right skills. Within this context, the government is introducing promising reforms to give young people a better start in the world of work.

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  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Slovenia 2017

    Skills will be fundamental to Slovenia’s success in achieving its ambitious vision for the future – a society in which people learn for and through life, are innovative, trust one another, enjoy a high quality of life and embrace their unique identity and culture. Slovenia’s success in achieving its vision will depend to a great extent on how well it develops, activates and uses people’s skills.

    The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Slovenia identifies a number of overarching priority areas for action. These were identified by analysing common themes that emerged from stakeholder perspectives on the most important challenges facing Slovenia in this domain, and also through the OECD’s analysis of the nine challenges identified and examined in the report. The three priority areas for action identified are: 1) empowering active citizens with the right skills for the future; 2) building a culture of lifelong learning; and 3) working together to strengthen skills.

  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Mexico 2017

    Skills are central to Mexico’s future prosperity and the well-being of its people. Improving opportunities for all Mexicans to develop high quality and relevant skills and supporting employers to improve their human resources management can help Mexico to raise productivity levels and, by extension, the incentives for employers to hire individuals in the formal sector. Fostering better and more equitable skills outcomes, especially for women and youth, will also provide the foundation for building a healthier, more equitable, and more cohesive society.

    The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Mexico sets out eight skills challenges for Mexico. These challenges were identified through two interactive workshops with stakeholders, bilateral meetings, internal discussions with experts at the OECD, and analysis of documents and data produced by the OECD and other organisations. The first six challenges refer to specific outcomes across the three pillars of developing, activating and using skills. The next two challenges refer to the “enabling” conditions that strengthen the overall skills system. Success in tackling these skills challenges will boost performance across the whole skills system.

  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: The Netherlands 2017

    The Netherlands today is prosperous, but its future success is not assured.  The Netherlands owes its success in no small part to actions it has taken in the past to develop a highly skilled population. Given the profound economic and social transformation that the Netherlands is currently undergoing, skills will be even more important for success in the future.  The Dutch education system and the skills of the Dutch population are strong overall. Therefore many of the opportunities for further improving the skills outcomes of the Netherlands are to be found in areas of society where the government has more limited influence, such as the workplace and community. As a consequence, achieving the Netherlands’ skills ambitions will require a whole-of-society approach.

    The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Netherlands identifies the following three skills priorities for the Netherlands - fostering more equitable skills outcomes, creating skills-intensive workplaces, and promoting a learning culture. These priorities were identified through the analysis of common themes that emerged from stakeholder perspectives on the most important skills challenges facing the Netherlands, and through the OECD’s analysis of the nine skills challenges identified and examined in the report.

  • 23-November-2017

    English

    OECD Guidelines on Measuring the Quality of the Working Environment

    This publication presents an internationally agreed set of guidelines for producing more comparable statistics on the quality of the working environment, a concept that encompasses all the non-pecuniary aspects of one's job, and is one of the three dimensions of the OECD Job Quality framework. These Guidelines take stock of current data availability in this field, review the analytic and policy uses of these measures, proposes a conceptual framework based on 6 dimensions and 17 characteristics (ranging from physical risk factors and work intensity, through to task discretion, autonomy and opportunities for self-realisation), assesses the statistical quality of measures in this field, and provides guidance to data producers and users on methodological challenges in this field. These Guidelines also include a number of prototype surveys modules that national and international agencies could use in their surveys.

    These Guidelines have been produced as part of the OECD Better Life Initiative, a pioneering project launched in 2011 with the objective of measuring society's conditions across 11 dimensions of people's well-being. They follow on from similar measurement guidelines on subjective well-being, micro statistics on household wealth, integrated analysis of the distribution on household income, consumption and wealth, as well as trust.

  • 22-November-2017

    English

    OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2017 - The digital transformation

    With some 200 indicators, the 2017 edition of the OECD Science, Technology and Industry (STI) Scoreboard shows how the digital transformation affects science, innovation, the economy, and the way people work and live. It aims to help governments design more effective science, innovation and industry policies in the fast-changing digital era.

    The charts and underlying data in this publication are available for download and over half the indicators contain additional data expanding the time and/or country coverage of the print edition.

  • 21-November-2017

    English

    Greening the Blue Economy in Pomorskie, Poland

    As coastal area on the Baltic Sea in north-central Poland, Pomorskie faces unique challenges and opportunities associated with the transition to a green economy, a diversified economy, growing population and significant natural resources. This report focuses on the sustainable development of the oceans and coastlines surrounding the region, known as the blue economy.
     
    Based on an OECD survey designed to capture the needs and perceptions of local employers (mostly of small- and medium-sized enterprises [SME]), this report analyses the specific skills needed to support green growth in Pomorskie, and how related labour market and training programmes can be made more effective in supporting the transition to a low-carbon economy.

     

  • 20-November-2017

    English

    Getting skills right in the United Kingdom

    The UK has enjoyed record-high employment levels in recent years and one of the lowest unemployment rates among OECD countries. However, labour productivity growth, which is closely linked to the use of skills, remains weak. As a result, the OECD’s Getting Skills Right: United Kingdom suggests that several actions should be taken to bring skill supply more in line with skill demand to help to boost growth, productivity and earnings.

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  • 20-November-2017

    English

    Boosting skills would drive UK growth and productivity

    To boost growth, productivity and earnings, the UK should encourage lifelong learning among adults and promote better skills utilisation, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 20-November-2017

    English

    Getting Skills Right: United Kingdom

    This report identifies effective strategies to tackle skills imbalances in the United Kingdom. It provides an assessment of practices and policies in the following areas: the collection and use of information on skill needs to foster a better alignment between skills acquisition and labour market needs; education and training policies targeting skills development and investment for individuals and employers; job creation policies to develop skills through on-the-job learning; and policies facilitating the entry of migrants with skills that are in demand. The assessment is based on country visits, desk research and data analysis conducted by the OECD secretariat.

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