By Date


  • 24-February-2016

    English

    Investing in Youth: Lithuania

    The present report on Lithuania is the fourth of a new series on "Investing in Youth" which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of the youth labour market and VET system in Lithuania from an international comparative perspective, and offers tailored recommendations to help improve school-to-work transitions. It also provides an opportunity for Lithuania to learn from the innovative measures that other countries have taken to strengthen the skills of youth and their employment outcomes, notably through the implementation of a Youth Guarantee.

     

  • 19-February-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Latvia 2016

    Latvia has undergone major economic and social change since the early 1990s. Despite an exceptionally deep recession following the global financial crisis, impressive economic growth over the past two decades has narrowed income and productivity gaps relative to comparator countries in the OECD. But Latvians report low degrees of life satisfaction, very large numbers of Latvians have left the country, and growth has not been inclusive. A volatile economy and very large income disparities create pressing needs for more effective social and labour-market policies. The government’s reform programme rightly acknowledges inequality as a key challenge. However, without sustained policy efforts and adequate resources, there is a risk that productivity and income growth could remain below potential and social cohesion could be further weakened by high or rising inequality.

  • 5-February-2016

    English

    Skills for growth: human capital composition and economic performance

    Skills for growth: human capital composition and economic performance

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  • 2-February-2016

    English

    Labor Migration in Asia - Building effective institutions

    This report analyses the institutions and structures that govern labor migration in Asia. It considers the important role of governments and other stakeholders in both labour-destination countries such as Japan, the Republic of Korea, and Singapore, and labour-sending countries such as India, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. Key issues are the extent to which these structures provide an orderly process for the movement of people between countries and whether the rights and the welfare of workers are protected.

     

  • 29-January-2016

    English

    Back to the future of work

    Back to the future of work, policy discussion at the Forum on the Future of Work and Labour Ministerial, 14 and 15 January 2016.

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  • 21-January-2016

    English

    What future for work in a digitised world?

    The digital revolution, globalisation and rapid population ageing are changing profoundly the types of jobs needed and the way we work, and may lead to even more dramatic changes over the coming decades. Will the many unemployed ever find a job again with the skills they have today in new world of work? Where are new jobs being created and what do they look like?

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  • 20-January-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Colombia 2016

    Colombia has made major economic and social advances in recent years. The combination of strong economic growth and policies targeted at the most vulnerable groups improved considerably the living standards of the Colombian population. Today, the country enjoys higher employment and labour force participation rates than the average of OECD countries and unemployment is steadily declining. Nevertheless, despite these positive trends, deep structural problems remain. Labour informality is widespread, the rate of self-employment is high and many employees have non-regular contracts. Income inequality is higher than in any OECD country and redistribution through taxes and benefits is almost negligible. In addition, half a century of internal conflict and violence has displaced a significant part of the population, and many of them are living in extreme poverty. Despite considerable progress, violence continues to be a challenge and also affects trade union members and leaders. The Colombian Government has undertaken important reforms in recent years to address these labour market and social challenges, and the efforts are gradually paying off. However, further progress is needed to enhance the quality of jobs and well-being for all. The main trust of this report is to support the Colombian Government in tackling labour market duality, generate trust between the social partners, develop inclusive and active social policies, and get the most out of international migration.

  • 15-January-2016

    English

    Employment situation, third quarter 2015, OECD

    OECD employment rate increases to 66.2% in the third quarter of 2015

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  • 15-January-2016

    English

    2016 OECD Employment and Labour Ministerial Meeting

    On 15 January 2016 Ministers from over 40 countries will gather at the OECD Headquarters in Paris, France, for the OECD Employment and Labour Ministerial Meeting. The Ministerial meeting will take place under the chairmanship of Ireland, with Chile, France and Germany as Vice-Chairs.

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  • 15-January-2016

    English

    OECD Meeting of the Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Committee at Ministerial Level welcome address

    We gather here as labour market conditions are improving. Job creation is strengthening in many countries, in no small part thanks to policy efforts made by many of you during these difficult years. But there are still over 40 million people looking for work in OECD countries, 8 million more than in December 2007.

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