United States


  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Middle-class economics

    In 2014, the US economy added more jobs than in any year since the 1990s. In fact, this longest streak of job growth on record has persisted into 2015. Inflation-adjusted wages are up by 1.4% annually over the last two years, more than twice the pace of the last recovery. But this is still not enough to make up for decades of subpar gains for middle-class families–a challenge shared by many other OECD economies.

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  • 30-April-2015

    English, PDF, 370kb

    United States Policy Brief: Labor Market and Skills Policies for Strong, Inclusive Growth

    Wage stagnation and rising inequality are putting pressure on many American households. Facilitating movement up the career ladder and shoring up wages at the bottom of the pay ladder are policy priorities.

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  • 1-December-2014

    English

    OECD's Gurria congratulates President Obama on taking action to address the unsustainable situation of undocumented immigrants

    On the occasion of the OECD High Level Policy Forum on Migration taking place on December 1 and 2 2014, Secretary General Angel Gurria congratulates President Obama on taking action to address the unsustainable situation of undocumented immigrants.

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  • 19-November-2014

    English

    OECD maps location of skilled U.S. workers and the employers who seek them

    U.S. employers are demanding skilled workforces, but are not always able to find a local supply, says a new OECD study looking at Job Creation and Local Economic Development.

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  • 18-September-2014

    English

    Employment and Skills Strategies in the United States

    How to stimulate growth and support job creation are two critical challenges that countries confront following the global financial crisis. The Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme of the OECD has developed international cross-comparative reviews on local job creation policies to examine the contribution of local labour market policy to boosting quality employment. Each country review examines the capacity of

  • 28-August-2014

    English

    An exploration of the determinants of the subjective well-being of Americans during the Great Recession

    This paper uses data from the American Life Panel to understand the determinants of well-being in the United States during the Great Recession. It investigates how various dimensions of subjective well-being reflected in the OECD Better Life Framework impact subjective well-being.

  • 24-July-2014

    English

    Improving well-being in the United States

    Life is quite good in the United States compared to other OECD countries, thanks to strong economic growth and technological progress having lifted average income to high levels. Nonetheless, there is evidence that the benefits from growth have not been sufficiently broad based.

  • 24-July-2014

    English

    Workplace stress in the United States: issues and policies

    Despite relative affluence, workplace stress is a prominent feature of the US labour market. To the extent that job stress causes poor health outcomes – either directly through increased blood ressure, fatigue, muscle pain, etc. or indirectly through increased rates of cigarette smoking – policy to lessen job stress may be appropriate.

  • 12-November-2013

    English

    Country specific-material

    Two rounds of the Survey of Adult Skills are under way: Round 1 (2008-13) with 24 participating countries, whose results were released in October 2013, and Round 2 (2012-16) with 9 participating countries, whose results will be released in 2016. A third round is scheduled to begin in May 2014.

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  • 10-October-2013

    English

    Shaping the post-crisis global economy

    There is no simple remedy for fixing the post-crisis global economy. But three key ingredients for sustainable long-term growth are jobs, equality and trust, said OECD Secretary-General in Washington.

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