Sweden


  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Family-friendly policies a key driver of economic growth

    The family-friendly policies introduced by Nordic countries over the past 50 years and associated increases in female employment have boosted growth in GDP per capita by between 10% and 20%, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, commonly known as the Nordic countries, have been leaders in the development of modern family and gender policy, and the explicit promotion of gender equality at home, at work, and in public life. Today, on many measures, they boast some of the most gender-equal labour markets in the OECD.
    This report shows that improvements in gender equality have contributed considerably to economic growth in the Nordic countries. Increases in female employment alone are estimated to account for anywhere between roughly 0.05 and 0.40 percentage points to average annual GDP per capita growth – equivalent to 3 to 20% of total GDP per capita growth over the past 50 years or so, depending on the country.
    The Nordic countries are closer than most to achieving gender equality in the labour market. But the last mile may well prove to be the longest one. To make further progress, a continued assessment of the effectiveness of existing public policies and workplace practices is needed. Only with resolve and a continued focus can Nordic countries ensure that men and women contribute to their economies and societies in gender equal measure.
     
  • 11-April-2018

    English, PDF, 423kb

    EU-OlderWorkers-Sweden

    This country note presents key policies to promote longer working lives implemented over the past decade in Sweden

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  • 19-December-2017

    English

    Government at a Glance

    Government at a Glance provides a dashboard of key indicators to help you analyse international comparisons of public sector performance.

  • 23-June-2017

    English

    Fighting gender inequality in Sweden

    Sweden ranks among the best OECD countries in terms of gender equality.

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  • 23-June-2017

    English

    Income, wealth and equal opportunities in Sweden

    Sweden is an egalitarian society in international comparison, and has managed to combine equity with economic efficiency.

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  • 21-April-2017

    English

    Structural inequality – the case of Sweden

    Structural trends not directly related to labour market functioning and redistribution have made a sizeable contribution to inequality and poverty in Sweden, but occupy only limited space in the income inequality debate.

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  • 28-February-2017

    English, PDF, 564kb

    Sweden Policy Brief: Employment- Boosting Skills from the Bottom Up

    The national unemployment rate in Sweden has fallen to less than 7%, but this aggregate number hides important regional disparities which are partly due to inadequate or mismatched skills. To reduce these imbalances, Sweden needs to enhance the engagement of employers at the local level, strengthen regional skills planning, and inject more flexibility in the management of employment and skills policies.

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  • 7-December-2016

    English

    Investing in Youth: Sweden

    This report is part of the series on 'Investing in Youth' which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the area of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on disadvantaged youth including those at risk of disengaging.
  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Sweden

    The costs of a persistent misalignment between the supply and demand for skills are substantial, ranging from lost wages for workers to lower productivity for firms and countries. Addressing skills imbalances has become even more of a concern as OECD governments reflect on the implications of technological progress, digitisation, demographic change and globalisation for jobs and work organisation. In light of these challenges, OECD has undertaken new research to shed light on how countries measure changing skill needs while ensuring that employment, training and migration institutions are responsive to the emergence of new skill requirements. The Getting Skills Right in Sweden review offers an in-depth analysis of the key areas where policy action is required to spur the development of an efficient system for skills assessment and anticipation to inform policy in the country. The report provides an assessment of practices in the following areas: i) the collection of information on existing and future skill needs; ii) the use of skill needs information to guide policy development in the areas of labour, education and migration; and iii) the existence of effective governance arrangements to ensure good co-ordination among the key stakeholders in the collection and use of skill needs information.
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